Loading…

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Poster [clear filter]
Thursday, December 10
 

3:00pm EST

A New Approach to Evaluating Information: A Reflection on RADAR (Poster)

For instruction librarians, teaching information literacy (IL) skills is often an important aspect of any lesson plan. One area of IL includes the critical evaluation of sources, an essential skill that students need to succeed as aspiring scholars and researchers. This ability to differentiate “good” from “bad” information is beneficial to students beyond their academic careers, and will help them navigate the “sea of information” for the rest of their lives. Typically, such evaluation skills are taught through applying the CRAAP test: Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, and Purpose. While humorous and memorable, the name of this test devalues the usefulness of IL and falls into the realm of “edutainment”.

An alternative - the RADAR test - sounds more serious, has more value as a research tool, and is both a memorable acronym and palindrome. The RADAR framework was conceptualized by Jane Mandailos of the American College of Greece, and it stands for Relevance, Authority, Date, Appearance, and Reason for Writing (2013). We taught RADAR as the framework for evaluating sources in a series of one-shot IL workshops, and assessed students’ reactions during the session as well as through a workshop assessment tool. We will present our findings on this framework for evaluating sources through an informal, anecdotal poster session, with suggestions and plans for future research. With the pervasiveness of misinformation and the rise of Web 2.0, information literacy is more important now than ever, and we must conceptualize that by framing it as a serious and important research skill.

 

Mandalios, J. (2013). RADAR: An approach for helping students evaluate Internet sources. Journal of Information Science, 39(4), 470–478


Speakers
avatar for Kim McPhee

Kim McPhee

Head, Teaching and Learning, Western University
Kim McPhee is Head, Teaching & Learning at Western Libraries at Western University where she leads a newly-formed team of Librarians and Library Assistants. Together, they are developing an intentional campus-wide information literacy (IL) program that will connect students to the... Read More →
KT

Kevin Tanner

Western University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Clarifying Uncertainty About Uncertainties: Exploring a Threshold Concept of Error Analysis in Introductory Physics Courses (Poster)

Uncertainty and error analysis is considered a “threshold concept” in the scientific community (i.e., a difficult but basic skill required to achieve success). However, there are relatively few studies related to undergraduate students’ understanding of this concept (Allie et al., 2008; Day et al., 2014; Holmes and Bonn, 2013; Macdonald et al., 2013). The main purpose of this study is to explore students’ understanding of data reporting, error analysis and propagation, and graphical tools. Pre- and post-surveys were conducted at the start and end of term, respectively, in three undergraduate introductory physics courses in the Physical Sciences, Integrated Sciences, and Arts and Sciences programs.  We aim to identify potential strengths and differences between these communities as they relate to physics.

The above surveys assessed students’ capabilities and confidence levels with a relatively new standardized instrument on uncertainty analysis (the Concise Data Processing Assessment; Day and Bonn, 2011) and a more-established instrument on Newtonian mechanics (the Force-Concept Inventory; Hestenes, Wells and Swackhamer, 1992; Huffman and Heller, 1995; Hake, 1998; Savinainen and Scott, 2001).  Students’ understanding of uncertainties is also compared to various other factors, including incoming high-school grades, program, and gender of the student.

We anticipate that this data will provide insights into how well students understand uncertainties and will guide future studies in the field of physics pedagogy. A deeper understanding of this area will facilitate improvements in how introductory physics classes introduce and develop the topic of uncertainties in the future, which would both encourage current students and potentially increase enrollment for future students in the physics community.

Speakers
RC

Robert Cockcroft

McMaster University
TS

Tiffany Shi

McMaster University
HW

Harrison Winch

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Community Engagement & Student Development: A Case Study in a 2nd Level Clinical Neuroscience Course in the Faculty of Science at McMaster University (Ontario, Canada) (Poster)

Community engagement is an effective pedagogical method that has been shown to have a wide range of positive impacts on student development (see review in Furco, Jones-White, Huesman & Gorny, 2012). The present study investigated the effects of community engagement on students in an undergraduate clinical neuroscience course with an enrollment of 130 students in the Faculty of Science at McMaster University. The community engagement component consisted of a mandatory group assignment called MacEngaged that required students to design and implement an outreach project in neuropsychology. Pre- and post-survey questionnaires used a 5-point Likert agreement scale to assess student perspectives under four general themes: academic enhancement and development, civic responsibility, professional and personal skill development. It was hypothesized that the community engagement experience would promote student development in all four of the themes. Based on previous research, the largest impact was expected in the areas of professional and personal skill development (Astin & Sax, 1998; Furco et al., 2012). Descriptive statistics suggested changes in 7 out of 25 categories of student development, including scores for independence, dependability, academic value, interest in course content, understanding of course content, importance of reflection, and value of reflection. Increases in the spread of post-survey agreement scores suggested that not all students found this experience to be beneficial. Findings from this preliminary study can be used to guide further areas of research and improve the course design for future offerings. 

 

Astin, A. W., & Sax, L. J. (1998). How undergraduates are affected by service participation. Journal of College Student Development39(3), 251–263. 

Furco, A., Jones-White, D., Huesman, R., & Gorny, L. (2012). Development of a model of the influence of service-learning on academic and social gains with the SERU survey.


Speakers
AK

Ayesha Khan

McMaster University
MM

Mirella Mazza

University of Toronto
PM

Paul McNicholas

McMaster University
CT

Cristina Tortora

McMaster University
DW

Deanne Wah

McMaster University
UZ

Urszula Zoladeski

McMaster University
Urszula Zoladeski is an Honours Biology student at McMaster University. The focus of her academic career is animal and human behaviour, specifically human learning and cognition. Participating in McMaster’s MacEngaged program as a second year student sparked her interest in service... Read More →


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Comparing differing perspectives on a shared experience: University administrators’ and faculty members’ perceptions of quality in Canadian higher education (Poster)

Conceptions of quality and approaches to quality assurance of academic programs have been receiving a great deal of attention both globally and locally (Altbach, 2010). Discussions surrounding quality and quality assessment at the postsecondary level are reverberating throughout the academy. With rapidly increasing student enrollment, educational stakeholders demanding greater accountability, and the increased desire for international recognition, discussions have intensified and led to the need for greater clarification with regards to how quality is defined, experienced and assessed.

This poster reports the results of two recent qualitative investigations, which focus on quality and quality assurance in Canadian higher education. These studies were conducted to better understand university administrators’ and faculty members’ conceptions of quality and experiences with institutional quality assurance processes. The following research question guided both studies: What conceptions of quality do university administrators/faculty members hold?

Aiming to explore notions of quality, both studies utilized a phenomenographic approach. Phenomenography is the “empirical study of the differing ways in which people experience, perceive, apprehend, understand, and conceptualize various phenomena in an aspect of the world around us” (Marton, 1994, 4428). To collect the qualitative data, open-ended interviews were conducted with administrators and faculty members in Ontario postsecondary institutions.

This poster outlines the background of the study and the methods utilized. Additionally, the poster will compare the results and present the two models that emerged from each study.

 

References:

Altbach, P. G. (2010). The realities of mass higher education in a globalized world. In D.B. Johnstone (Ed.), Higher education in a global society (pp. 25-41). Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar.

Marton, F. (1994) Phenomenography: A research approach to investigating the different understandings of reality. Journal of Thought, 21(3), 28-49.


Speakers
DG

Danielle Gabay

McMaster University
LG

Lori Goff

McMaster University
Lori Goff is the Manager of Program Enhancement at McMaster University. Her research interests in peer mentoring and quality enhancement are fundamentally focused on enhancing students’ learning experiences within the university context


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Cultivating diverse communities: Equity and diversity in Canada’s teaching and learning centres (Poster)

As teaching and learning centres within Canada have rapidly evolved and expanded within the last few decades, various aspects of these institutes have been researched and described, such as the history of centres, the work of staff members, and both the function and offerings which they provide. However, information has not been gathered with regards to the diversity of social identities of those personnel working within Canada’s teaching and learning support centres. Existing literature identifies the importance of diversity in postsecondary institutions and especially within teaching and learning spaces (Stanley, 2001; Mighty, Ouellett & Stanley 2010).

This current project seeks to address this gap in the literature. The study aims to explore conceptions of diversity within Canada’s teaching and learning centres, and seeks to document the various identities that are present within these organizations. More specifically, this investigation utilizes an online survey questionnaire and in-depth interviews to collect demographic data and to gather faculty, staff, student and administrators' perceptions of diversity. In addition, this exploratory, national study aims to determine areas for improving diversity and inclusivity within Canada’s teaching and learning centres, as well as put forth recommendations for future research.

As this study is a work in progress, this poster presentation will outline the background of the study, its significance, methods utilized, preliminary findings, and suggestions for future research.

 

References:

Mighty, J., Ouellett, M., and C. Stanley. (2010). Unheard voices among faculty developers. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 122, 103-112.

Stanley, C. (2001). A review of the pipeline: The value of diversity in staffing teaching and learning centers in the new millennium. Journal of Faculty Development, 18(2) 75-86.


Speakers
DG

Danielle Gabay

McMaster University
AL

Alex Liu

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Demystifying Science Education: Developing a Conceptual Model (Poster)

The potential of a life science course seminar course that was administered at McMaster on science education which focused on the significance of active and deep learning to serve as a conceptual model for post-secondary education will be analyzed in this presentation. The design and execution of the course will be explained using Seligman’s model of flourishing based on the theory of wellbeing based on five pillars- positive emotion, engagement, meaning, relationships, and accomplishment. The presentation will analyse the course using this conceptual framework focusing on students’ wellbeing in the learning process. The design of wellbeing is considered as a construct based on the positive relationship between the five major pillars and the poster will elaborate on how the course elements aligned or misaligned with the framework. By enabling them to be a part of a collaborative learning enterprise, students received the opportunity to establish a strong connection to their own learning wherein they could analyze their own strengths and weaknesses, and find value in what they did. In fact, the presentation will elaborate on how the course attempted to demystify the concept of education by proposing a shift from an authoritative paradigm where students act as passive consumers of education, to a co-operative enterprise where students act as change agents actively engaged in the development and execution of the curricula to result in phenomenally improved learning outcomes. 


Speakers
LG

Lori Goff

McMaster University
Lori Goff is the Manager of Program Enhancement at McMaster University. Her research interests in peer mentoring and quality enhancement are fundamentally focused on enhancing students’ learning experiences within the university context


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Direct Observation Tools for Clerks - A Literature Review (Poster)

Direct observation tools (DOTs) are used to help preceptors assess students’ clinical competence by systematically observing them engage in a clinical encounter. Miller’s Pyramid of Assessment (separating knowledge from competence from performance from action) provides the theoretical basis for this evaluation method. These tools allow for evaluation in natural settings, assess soft skills, minimize recall bias and improve accuracy of judgement. This literature review appraises the psychometric properties, strengths and weaknesses of DOTs to make recommendations for use in ambulatory clinical training settings.

Clinical encounter cards (CECs) are pocket-sized cards that involve 1) assessment of different competencies pertinent to a clinical encounter and 2) a single global rating on all domains assessed. Encounter cards have good validity properties and reach high reliability after only a few encounters. They have garnered support from learners and teachers due to their exceptional ability to promote formative feedback. The Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise is a frequently-used tool that requires ratings on six domains of clinical competence along with open ended feedback. It has consistently strong construct validity and reliability but is only moderately able to predict performance on other measures of competence.

Clinical encounter cards are the most reliable, valid and successful in providing formative feedback; this prompted McMaster University to create an evidence-based CEC for use in a family medicine clinical rotation. Intuitively, the CEC may be generalized for use in personal interaction training for other professionals (e.g. psychologists, social workers, project managers). Future research in these settings is necessary to corroborate this theory.

Speakers
JB

Judy Baird

McMaster University
avatar for Romesa Khalid

Romesa Khalid

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Helping Science Students with the High School-to-University Transition (Poster)

This project aims to further understand and alleviate the problems caused by the mismatch between the expectations of high school students about university and the academic realities of first year in science. This project builds upon surveys administered during the last academic year (2014/2015) that focused on the transition of students into first year.   The previous surveys will be adapted to create new surveys suitable for both the current grade 12 high-school students and first-year undergraduate students.  Using the collected survey data to inform follow-up questions, we will develop focus groups for high-school students facilitated by upper-year science mentors.  Results from all surveys and focus groups will translate into the creation of a resource guide that will eventually be distributed to the greater community - high-school students, undergraduate students, and instructors.  This presentation will describe the results from the 2014/2015 data, provide further details of the instruments being developed, and discuss our larger goals to support existing McMaster transition programs and ultimately facilitate more communication between high schools and universities.

Citations:

Bone, E. K., & Reid, R. J. (2011). Prior learning in biology at high school does not predict performance in the first year at university.Higher Education Research & Development30(6), 709–724. http://doi.org/10.1080/07294360.2010.539599

Briggs, A. R. J., Clark, J., & Hall, I. (2012). Building bridges: Understanding student transition to university. Quality in Higher Education18(1), 3–21. http://doi.org/10.1080/13538322.2011.614468

Pancer, S. M., Hunsberger, B., Pratt, M. W., & Alisat, S. (2000). Cognitive complexity of expectations and adjustment to university in the First year. Journal of Adolescent Research15(1), 38–57. http://doi.org/10.1177/0743558400151003


Speakers
CB

Chelsea Bodoe

McMaster University
RC

Robert Cockcroft

McMaster University
avatar for Patricia Kousoulas

Patricia Kousoulas

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Leveraging Resources Across Units and Universities to Address Academic Literacies and Research Skills in Ontario Graduate Students (Poster)

Student2Scholar (S2S) is a fully online and open course that aims to teach academic literacies and research skills to social science graduate students.  Set to launch in December 2015, S2S was conceived of and created by a diverse and distributed team of academic librarians, faculty, graduate students, and staff from three Ontario Universities: Western, the University of Toronto, and Queen’s.  Members of the project team brought with them varying degrees of experience and expertise across a range of disciplinary and teaching and learning backgrounds, including: adult education, information literacy, and online learning (to name only a few).

S2S serves as a standout example of what can be achieved when a teaching and learning project is resourced to leverage the time and talent of a cross-section of the academic community whose professional goals and educational interests are shared, despite working in seemingly disparate and often disconnected areas of campus or institutions of higher education.

This poster presentation will highlight the pedagogical (i.e., conceptual and theoretical) framework used in the design S2S, and make explicit the connections between the design of the course and the human resources required, and ultimately assigned to contribute to the development of the course (e.g., organizational development, design and development of modules and assets, writers, etc). Using S2S as a case study in online, module-based, interdisciplinary course development, MIIETL conference delegates will learn how to leverage established and yet-to-be formed relationships across academic units and institutions to realize mutually beneficial teaching and learning outcomes.


Speakers
avatar for Melanie Mills

Melanie Mills

Director, Library & Learning Services, Huron University College
Melanie Mills is the Director of Library & Learning Services at Huron University College, an Affiliate of Western University, where she has worked in various roles and libraries over her twenty-year career. Melanie currently serves as VP and President-Elect of the Ontario Library... Read More →
EP

Elan Paulson

Western University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

MCYU in the City: An outreach model for conducting Community Engagement (Poster)

MCYU in the City is a year-long community engagement initiative that invites undergraduate and graduate students from all Faculties at McMaster to apply their research interests to public issues (namely those inspired by the needs of Hamilton’s priority neighborhoods). Students are trained to create and facilitate inquiry-based workshops in multidisciplinary teams to children and youth in the Hamilton community. Importantly, the program provides McMaster students with training in community engagement, knowledge translation, inquiry-based learning along with significant teaching and outreach experience.

We would like to present results of our pilot study, and to discuss our research design as we move into our second year. We successfully executed our first ‘MCYU in the City’ event in May 2015 in the Hamilton community of McQuesten with much acclaim from families. Approximately 20 McMaster undergraduate and graduate students presented their inquiry based workshops to approximately 60 students from neighbourhoods across Hamilton.

This is a new model of outreach for conducting community engagement, as we are the first Canadian university that is apart of the European Children's University Network. MCYU in the City is the also the only institution in the network to train students to develop and deliver their workshops as an outreach initiative. Our program is working in collaboration with MIIETL, to develop our research design. As MCYU in the City moves into its second year, the program will be expanding into more Hamilton neighbourhoods, increasing McMaster student involvement, with a vision to empowering students by demonstrating the value of their education using workshop development and community engagement.


Speakers
JE

Julia Evanovitch

McMaster University
avatar for Beth Levinson

Beth Levinson

Educational Developer, McMaster University
Beth Levinson is an Educational Developer at the Paul R. MacPherson Institute for Leadership, Innovation, and Excellence in Teaching at McMaster University where she has worked since 2014. Beth’s focus is on developing community engaged initiatives and Experiential Education. She... Read More →
DM

Danielle Martak

McMaster University
SR

Sandeep Raha

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

One Week, Many Ripples: Measuring the Impacts of the McMaster Fall Break on Student Stress Physiology (Poster)
Over the past decade, universities and colleges across Canada have introduced a fall break into their term calendars with the goal of reducing student stress and increasing student retention and success. Such effects could be expected to allow students to be more active and enduring participants in their university community and experience. In 2015, a full-week fall break was introduced at McMaster University. In spite of the increasing adoption of a fall break in post-secondary institutions across Canada, there is no published research investigating whether implementing a fall break successfully meets the goal of decreasing student stress. In this study, we are evaluating student stress through surveys, focus groups, and cortisol levels. Here, we report on the pattern of results in cortisol, which is a physiological marker of stress that can be extracted from saliva. Undergraduate students at McMaster were asked to collect saliva in the week before the fall break and the week after the fall break. To provide a control group, students at McGill University, which does not have a fall break, were asked to do the same. Levels of cortisol were compared to measure stress levels between and within each group. If the fall break is effective at lowering student stress, cortisol levels should be a) lower after the fall break than before the fall break in McMaster students, and b) more consistent in McGill students than McMaster students. Results could support future evidence based decision-making regarding the fall break, both at McMaster and at other Canadian post-secondary institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Agnew

Michael Agnew

Postdoctoral Fellow, McMaster University
Michael Agnew is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) at McMaster University. He received his PhD in Religious Studies from McMaster University in 2015.
BB

Bismah Basharat

McMaster University
EB

Elliott Beaton

University of New Orleans
SB

Sean Beaudette

McMaster University
NC

Nathan Cooper

McMaster University
AK

Ayesha Khan

McMaster University
AM

Arpa Modi

McMaster University
HP

Heather Poole

McMaster University
Heather Poole is a postdoctoral fellow at the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Heather's background is in experimental psychology.
JS

Jeremy Sandor

McMaster University
SS

Signy Sheldon

McGill University
JW

Joshua Wiener

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Small steps into the sky: Introductory astronomy students’ knowledge prior to planetarium education (Poster)
While there are large bodies of literature evaluating both the efficacy of planetariums for astronomy instruction at a primary school level (e.g., Brazell, 2009) and university students' level of astronomy knowledge (e.g., Rudmann, 2002), there is little research concerning the use of planetariums for higher education.  The aim of this study is to contribute to answering the questions of whether planetariums are an effective teaching environment for university-level courses, and whether interactive lessons in planetariums are more effective than traditional lecture-style planetarium shows for university instruction. We anticipate the results for this study may be generalized to other disciplines that also use immersive environments and hands-on activities as part of their teaching practices. We are testing planetarium instruction as part of two introductory astronomy courses offered at McMaster University. Participating students enrolled in the courses have taken a pre-test to gauge their existing understanding of celestial motion and the Solar System, and were invited to participate in an intervention partway through the course before taking an identical post-test at the end of term. The intervention consisted of two one-hour classes about celestial motion and the Solar System, either in a classroom or in a planetarium, and with either an interactive lesson or a traditional lecture-style show. We report on the initial findings from the pre-test about students' knowledge of astronomy as they enter their introductory astronomy courses, and discuss our next steps in the project.

Speakers
RC

Robert Cockcroft

McMaster University
IF

Ian Fare

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium