Loading…

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Wednesday, December 9
 

9:00am EST

Welcome
Wednesday December 9, 2015 9:00am - 9:15am EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

9:15am EST

Keynote Presentation by Katarina Mårtensson
The Relevance of Networks and Microcultures in SoTL

Course instructors are the most pivotal actors if teaching and learning is to develop. Engagement in scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) can be rewarding for faculty members, as well as for students, and can improve the quality of teaching as well as student learning (Trigwell & Shale, 2004). However, these processes do not happen in isolation. Faculty, students and academic support staff are all part of sociocultural, collegial contexts where norms, values and traditions of teaching and assessment are developed over time (Trowler, 2008). This leads to certain taken-for-granted, assumptions and practices in relation to teaching and learning. Any teaching team, working group, academic programme or department could be said to constitute a microculture (Roxå & Mårtensson, 2015) that has developed their own set of such traditions in relation to teaching and learning. SoTL can therefore be considered an endeavour that can and should contribute to develop not only individual faculty and students’ learning, but also such local microcultures.

This presentation will highlight some of the sociocultural factors that influence SOTL- work in the academic workplace. These factors are useful to know about whether one is in academia as a faculty member, a support staff, a student, a leader, an educational developer or other. Drawing on a forthcoming book-chapter (Mårtensson & Roxå, 2016), concepts such as significant networks (Roxå & Mårtensson, 2009), academic microcultures (Roxå & Mårtensson, 2015) and communities of practice (Wenger, 1999) will be explored and exemplified, and their relevance for SOTL-work will be discussed. 

Bio:

Dr. Katarina Mårtensson is an academic developer at the Centre for Educational Development, Lund University, Sweden. Her work includes supporting organisational development through academic development, scholarship of teaching and learning, and leadership. Her research focuses on social networks, academic microcultures, and academic leadership, and she finalised a PhD-dissertation in 2014 titled ”Influencing teaching and learning microcultures: Academic development in a research-intensive university”. She is regional vice-president Europe in ISSOTL, the International Society for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and co-editor of IJAD, the International Journal for Academic Development. 

Speakers
KM

Katarina Mårtensson

Lund University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:35am EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

10:35am EST

11:00am EST

Highlights of a National Survey on the Impact of the 3M National Teaching Fellowship Program
As part of a three year study we have collected and analyzed data regarding the impact of the 3M National Teaching Fellowship through focus groups, a national survey, and the collection of archival material. Throughout our study, we maintain a focus on how this award has evolved over time, the impact on the individual, institution, the STLHE community at large, and the broader Canadian context. In this presentation we will highlight findings from our national survey that targets 3M Fellows, educational developers, faculty, students, and administrators. In total we had over 1000 individuals from across Canada respond to the questionnaire and during our session we will provide highlights and share how the 3M national teaching fellowship program makes a difference to Canadian higher education. Specifically, we address whether award-winning teachers in departments and across institutions continue to make significant contributions to learning and teaching after receiving the award? What impact have the almost 300 3M National Teaching Fellows had, if any, on Canadian higher education? And how would one know? We share our example by identifying the types of data that would describe and assess its impact on the quality of teaching and learning in Canadian higher education.

Speakers
avatar for Arshad Ahmad

Arshad Ahmad

Associate Vice-President, Teaching and Learning & Director, MIIETL, McMaster University
Dr. Arshad Ahmad is the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning and Director of Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) at McMaster University. He is the Past Coordinator of the 3MNTF program and a 3M National Teaching Fellow. He is the Past... Read More →
RS

Ron Smith

Concordia University
DS

Denise Stockley

Queen's University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am EST
Meeting Room B

11:00am EST

Using Discourses of Community to Achieve Curricular Change: A Case Study of Cross-campus Initiatives at OCAD University
Focusing on examples of cross-campus curricular initiatives at OCAD University, this short paper will consider how to engage faculty through discourses of community to develop and advance curricula change. The session will begin with a brief overview of change initiatives in the postsecondary context, examining in particular how the discourse of “academic freedom” can be widened from the individual instructor or course to include consideration of the needs and concerns of multiple discourse communities—institutional, pedagogical, disciplinary, professional, societal—in the development of course and program-level curricula. The session will focus primarily on examples at OCAD University and the successes and challenges that were faced in the development and implementation of cross-campus quality enhancement initiatives, including a university-wide Writing Across the Curriculum initiative. The session will include the demonstration of strategies and tools used in professional learning contexts that employed approaches based on the language of and positioning within communities of teaching and learning. Participants will be invited to use and adapt these strategies to their own context and share their own approaches and tools.

Speakers
CD

Cary DiPietro

Senior Educational Developer, OCAD University
Dr. Cary DiPietro is a Senior Educational Developer in the Faculty & Curriculum Development Centre and writing specialist who leads curriculum development for OCAD University’s Writing Across the Curriculum Initiative. He also developed an Academic Integrity Resource Development... Read More →


Wednesday December 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am EST
Meeting Room D

11:00am EST

Digital Humanities to the Rescue! Pedagogy, Practice and Politics
In our inboxes, meetings and twitter feeds, we weekly, if not daily encounter the Digital Humanities (DH); it appears that the DH are now a necessary inclusion into nearly all discussions of the Humanities. Our project examines the dominant discourses surrounding the DH; specifically, we critique the discursive framing of the DH as a promise of rescue and renewal for the Humanities. We highlight how the DH is presumed to include the teaching of marketable skills, to provide new avenues for research funding and to offer a way of (finally) legitimizing Humanities research methods. We observe, at our institution the establishment of a new centre on digital scholarship and a tempered hopefulness of what the DH could do for a Faculty struggling with decreased enrollments and funding shortages. We use our critical discourse analysis of texts (which narrate the recent history and current state of the DH) to serve as a departure point for discussion with DH instructor-practitioners about their pedagogy, their practice and their politics in the DH. We pay particular attention to what is often unasked in broader DH discourse: Who is doing work in DH? Whose work is privileged or taken seriously? How do relations of difference (race, gender, dis/ability, class) and power relations figure into DH pedagogies and play out in DH classrooms? The focus of our ‘in progress’ project is the relationship between specific discourses (e.g. DH as rescue for an ailing Humanities) and the practice of DH teaching.

Speakers
MV

Marie Vander Kloet

McMaster University
avatar for Devon Mordell

Devon Mordell

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am EST
Meeting Room C

11:00am EST

TrAcademic: Gamified Practicals for Computer Science

Like most first year CS courses, UTSC's Introduction to Computer Science (CSCA08) has always struggled with issues around community building, and differential learning in a course where the prior experience levels of students can vary wildly. Either students with prior programming experience would find the course boring, or novice students would find the material too intimidating. The TrAcademic system replaced the traditional lab based approach with gamified practical sessions, where students could earn points for completing various tasks, which were set relative to their experience level. Experience points are earned every time a student attends a practical session, challenge points are awarded for anything from solving complicated problems to weekly logic puzzles, and (perhaps most interestingly), teaching points are awarded for helping fellow students with material, or demonstrating a solution to the group.

This allows more advanced students to spend their time either completing challenge questions where they can push themselves, or helping their fellow students, while novice students get help from their peers rather than waiting for the TA. With this system, practicals have evolved from a traditional lab system where some students were bored, some were frustrated, and most were waiting passively for the TA to get around to them, into a facilitated study group, where students are helping one another learn. Students are more engaged, and have motivation to work together to build a community, rather than succumb to the traditional stereotype of the isolated computer scientist.


Speakers
avatar for Brian Harrington

Brian Harrington

University of Toronto - Scarborough


Wednesday December 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am EST
Meeting Room A

11:30am EST

Developing Communities of Pedagogical Innovation

Fitting with this year's conference theme of "Cultivating Community" we describe a recently initiated Impact Fellowship program at McMaster University, designed to generate evidence of high-impact teaching practices and to enhance teaching and learning at McMaster Universit. The Impact Fellowship model has been conceptualized using a socio-cultural perspective and aligns with a distributed leadership model. The primary goal of the Impact Fellowship program is to build community capacity within the Faculties whereby Impact Fellows serve as mentors and advocates in sharing impact assessment strategies. Drawing from the work of Martensson & Roxa (2015) the program aims is to increase the potential for development of local teaching and learning cultures. While such models have shown to enhance leadership at the local level, there is some research that specifically investigates how these construct enhance educational development (Martenesson & Roxa, 2015). The purpose of this research is to explore in what ways the Fellowship program supports or challenges learning, capacity development, and scholarship.

In this interactive short paper presentation, we will discuss the evolving process of developing the Impact Fellowship program model, as well as strategies for exchanging ideas, broadening conversations about teaching and learning, building community networks. We will facilitate a broad discussion on the direct and indirect benefits of such a process on cultivating leadership.

References:

Martensson, K., & Roxa, T. (2015). Leadership at the local level – Enhancing educational development, Educational Management Administration & Leadership, 1-16.


Speakers
avatar for Philippa Carter

Philippa Carter

Teaching Professor, McMaster University
Philippa Carter has taught Religious Studies at McMaster for almost twenty-five years as a graduate teaching assistant, a sessional lecturer, a contractually-limited appointment and now as the permanent teaching professor. She has taught or co-taught the department's full-year introductory... Read More →
TD

Thomas Doyle

McMaster University
JE

Julia Evanovitch

McMaster University
NF

Nancy Fenton

McMaster University
Nancy Fenton, PhD; Educational Consultant; McMaster Institute for Innovation & Excellence in Teaching & Learning (MIIETL); McMaster University
MM

Mandeep Malik

McMaster University
NP

Nikolai Penner

McMaster University
LR

Leeanne Romane

McMaster University
SS

Sarah Symons

McMaster University
OW

Olive Wahoush

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm EST
Meeting Room B

11:30am EST

Providing Support for Business Statistics Course: Collaboration Between Faculty and Library Services Professionals

Applied Statistics for Business is taught as a required course in the second year of the DeGroote School of Business. The course provides an introduction to the application of statistical analysis in managerial decision-making. One major component of the student evaluation is a semester long project, in which students are required to work in groups to perform statistical analysis on real-world data sets.

The students from this class began approaching the Data Specialist and Business Librarian with high-level questions related to their project, while some could be answered with the help of traditional resources and others through highly specialized data sets. Nearly every group came to the library seeking help for their project. It became apparent that a unique collaboration between the library services professionals and the faculty member should be established to build resources and to provide support for this group project.

Thousand, Villa and Nevin (2006) identified this process of collaboration in teaching and learning between faculty and library professionals as consultative and stop-in support. Assessing needs for any modifications to existing supports or curriculum are currently evaluated. During the presentation, after discussing both the formal and informal structure of our collaboration, its benefits and challenges, the audiences will be encouraged to share their experience of such collaborations. Continuous improvements that were made to the original collaboration model will also be highlighted.

References

Thousand, J.S., Villa, R.A., & Nevin, A.I. (2006). Many faces of collaborative planning and teaching. Theory into Practice45 (3), 239-248. doi: 10.1207/s15430421tip4503_6

Speakers
FB

Fouzia Baki

McMaster University
VJ

Vivek Jadon

McMaster University
IP

Ines Perkovic

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm EST
Meeting Room D

11:30am EST

Surveys and Poetry and Feminist Identity, Oh My! A Workshop on Comparing and Contrasting Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods in SoTL

This workshop is an opportunity for hands-on investigation into quantitative and qualitative research methods in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).

More specifically, the workshop focuses on an on-going SoTL project regarding feminist identity development. By using the research project as a case study, the aim is to actively engage participants in both research methods. The idea is to have participants critically reflect on the advantages and disadvantages of both methodologies.

 A breakdown of the workshop:

1) 10 minute introduction to our quantitative study on feminist identity development

2) 5 minutes to write poetry as a qualitative method of research

3) 5 minutes to share poetry with class, trying to identify if the poems fit on the feminist identity development scale

4) 5 minutes-questions 

 


Speakers
OC

Orsolya Csaszar

University of Guelph
VW

Veronica Ward

University of Guelph


Wednesday December 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm EST
Meeting Room C

11:30am EST

Opening Doors for More Authentic Undergraduate Research Experiences

Laboratory research is at the heart of the science education, yet many undergraduates will have little direct exposure to our research labs during their studies. True, most will be enrolled in a few large course-based labs, but space, resources and, importantly, time, dramatically limit student access to an authentic, independent research experience. As enrollments increase and research funding tightens, the proportion of our students participating in substantial laboratory experiences is decreasing, with the few available spaces restricted to the fourth year. This means that a vital complement of skills and attitudes essential to modern science – critical yet creative thinking, experimental design, data interpretation, even career planning – are only experienced, if at all, toward the end of a student's undergraduate studies. Indeed, the majority of our students will simply not have this opportunity.

Given this observation, we are developing tools and opportunities for researchers so that they can engage multiple undergraduate students early and often in original, publishable research.  The goal is to bring the successful elements of peer-based learning and teaching into thesis experiences. One core tool is an iBook lab manual that walks young researchers through some of the basics of lab research on their own and with their peers, with modest personal supervision by faculty, graduate students, and postdocs. To be clear: this manual would not replace the value of a mentor in the lab, but it will dramatically ease the workload on lab mentors, thus allowing faculty to bring more undergraduates into an authentic lab experience.


Speakers
KD

Kimberley Dej

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm EST
Meeting Room A

12:00pm EST

Lunch
Wednesday December 9, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

1:00pm EST

Implementing a University-wide Learning Technologies Coaches Program
The University of Calgary is implementing a program that will provide coaching and mentoring for instructors who are integrating learning technologies in their courses. The coaches are supported in an integrated, multidisciplinary community of practice, with professional development and communication facilitated through personnel in the Educational Development Unit. The distributed and context-specific nature of the coaches embedded in each faculty allows for flexibility in supporting various platforms and pedagogies, while also providing central coordination and professional development of the coaches.

This program was designed after the "D2L Coaches" model that was implemented by several faculties during the campus migration to D2L, and the scope has been broadened to include exploration and integration of any relevant learning technologies in all faculties at the University of Calgary. I will share a high-level overview of the program, as well as examples of how the Coach model has transformed the integration of learning technologies across the University of Calgary.

Speakers
avatar for D'Arcy Norman

D'Arcy Norman

Manager, Technology Integration Group, Educational Development Unit, Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning, University of Calgary
From the Official Staff Bio™: D’Arcy leads the technology integration group in finding and developing technology platforms that enhance student learning, and in collaborating with instructors and faculty leadership to adopt and support new learning technologies. He has spent... Read More →


Wednesday December 9, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm EST
Meeting Room B

1:00pm EST

Building a Sense of Belonging: The Impact of a University-wide Exam Prep Initiative
Students who feel a sense of belonging in their educational environment have greater academic engagement and success (Freeman et al., 2007). Exam Jam is a campus-wide initiative at the University of Toronto Mississauga that aims to foster these positive educational outcomes by reducing student stress and promoting productive study habits.  Exam Jam brings together the campus community in wellness activities (e.g., therapy dogs, massages, healthy food, crafts) and academic support programming (e.g., instructor-led course specific exam review sessions, study workshops, and peer-facilitated groups). This study examined the academic success of an Exam Jam review session for an introductory course in Anthropology (N = 726).  Term and exam grades of Exam Jam participants (N = 239) were compared to the rest of the students in the course (N = 474). Independent t-tests (p< 0.05) revealed that Exam Jam students had significantly higher grades in all categories.  Exam Jam participants with term grades of >80% (N = 116) performed significantly higher on the final exam than other students in this cohort (N = 185).  Self-selection resulted in the highest performing students overwhelmingly attending Exam Jam.  Students who were low performers were less likely to attend. This supports the findings of Lukes & McConnell (2014) who found that students with interior motivation and self-regulatory study habits utilize academic support systems. Exam Jam participants positively ranked the wellness activities in post-session surveys.  Students felt that Exam Jam activities and the participation of instructors in particular created a caring campus environment.

Speakers
SF

Sherry Fukuzawa

University of Toronto - Mississauga
JG

Jackie Goodman

University of Toronto - Mississauga
CJ

Chad Jankowski

University of Toronto - Mississauga


Wednesday December 9, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm EST
Meeting Room A

1:00pm EST

Cultivating Collaborative University-Community Partnerships: Using the IMPACT (Interdisciplinary, Meaningful/Mentorship, Practice, Applied, Collaborative/Community, Transformative) Project Educational Model of Teaching and Learning (2-hour workshop)
The IMPACT Project (Interdisciplinary, Meaningful / Mentorship, Practice, Applied, Collaborative / Community, Transformative) provides opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students from diverse disciplines (Engineering, Biology, Occupational Therapy) to apply their knowledge to address problems identified in collaboration with community partners. Throughout this project, teams of students work on open-ended problems to explore, create, and assess ideas with the goal of developing potential solutions. Students mobilize knowledge and hone their communication, critical thinking and teamwork skills. Our IMPACT Project model serves to catalyze student creativity, innovation, and community engagement. During our interactive workshop, we will demonstrate the steps required for implementation of our IMPACT Project model using a simulation of educator / student activities, and administrative logistics to connect and network with community partners. We will conduct interactive brainstorming discussions with participants that will identify the uses of the IMPACT Project model for addressing the needs of community partners while engaging students in the learning process. We will also have representatives of our current community partners in attendance to clarify and clearly demonstrate the diverse benefits of our IMPACT Project model.

Speakers
MD

Megan Dodd

McMaster University
RF

Robert Fleisig

McMaster University
LK

Lovaye Kajiura

McMaster University
Lovaye Kajiura is an Assistant Professor (Permanent Teaching Professor) in the Department of Biology at McMaster University. Her pedagogical research interests focus upon interdisciplinary collaborative mentorship at diverse levels of education, integrated case-based studies, and... Read More →
BV

Brenda Vrkljan

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 1:00pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room 2

1:00pm EST

Dialogue (2-hour workshop)

Our department is undergoing a transformation. We are at a precipice: and aim to leap unswervingly into an unknown so vast it cannot be perceived.  The end intention; to build a tightknit learning community adept at self-directed learning …. in an online milieu.

And so we set upon a path of designing a high-quality online course inspired by the following advice of Puzziferro and colleagues in their eloquently stated definition of quality online courses:

“Quality online courses are well-organized into learning units; have clear learning goals and objectives; engage the learner through interaction with content… Most of all, online courses should be fun, engaging, pedagogically sound, and relevant.”(1)

We adopted a community-based approach to our online course design. Funded by the Ontario Online Initiative (OOI) - and in collaboration with MIIETL, Pearson and other faculty at Western University - we produced a preliminary prototype of our desired online course.

But what of the student experience? How do we provide a safe, nurturing environment on a platform so technologically advanced it can render the participant devoid of such community-based feelings of belonging? And so, to develop the sought-after online learning community we are employing a rather progressive approach: we want you. We seek YOUR input and YOUR ideas on what constitutes a nurturing environment in an online milieu.  This manifests as a 2-hour immersive Community of Practice (CoP) workshop.

This is a resolute immersion in the learning process at all stages of the learning journey. It will start out small and unassuming in order to adjust to such a thought, but our end intent is to gain momentum throughout the workshop. The end result? We cannot even fathom. The journey? Priceless….


Speakers
MM

Michelle MacDonald

McMaster University
FV

Felicia Vulcu

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 1:00pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room 5

1:00pm EST

Teaching and Assessing Skills in Academic Research and Writing, Critical Thinking, and Information Literacy (2-hour workshop)

While students are learning the important content and concepts in a university course, they are also developing essential skills in academic research, critical thinking, and information literacy. These skills are sometimes considered secondary, or it is assumed that students should be learning these outside of class with minimal instruction and no clear marks or credit given.

In this workshop, we will discuss academic research, critical thinking, and information literacy (IL) by providing instruction and guidance on developing, emphasizing, assessing, and providing feedback on research skills, all in the context of the essential content and concepts of a university course.  The workshop will be led by librarians with experience in designing curriculum that employ Backward Design, the new IL Framework from the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), and a variety of assessment practices.

Faculty, TAs, librarians, archivists, and writing centre staff will benefit from discussing considerations and aspects of teaching and assessment of skills in academic research, critical thinking, and IL.  Participants will consider the benefits of being intentional and transparent in communicating with their students the goals of teaching and assessing these skills.  By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Develop strategies for incorporating teaching of these skills into their courses, including through collaboration across the university 
  • Develop a process for collecting and documenting evidence of learning for assessing these skills 
  • Determine actions they can take based on evidence of learning
  • Create a lesson plan working through learning activities, assessment, and post-assessment actions

Speakers
CB

Colleen Burgess

Western University
avatar for Lise Doucette

Lise Doucette

Assessment Librarian, Western University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 1:00pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room D

1:00pm EST

The Role of Peer Reviews in the Evolution of SoTL (2-hour workshop)

In this workshop, we will initiate a discussion of the journal peer review as a specific genre that plays a significant role in defining the SoTL community. These brief writings have enormous power in defining the boundaries of the community, as they can ostracize potential members or facilitate a sense of belonging.  They can also affect the work itself, guiding manuscript content in one direction or another.

Workshop Activities

  1. The workshop will begin with our analysis of a random sampling of reviews from Teaching & Learning Inquiry
  2. Participants will be invited to identify the common characteristics of these reviews.
  3. Participants will consider how peer review in SoTL differs from peer review in their disciplinary contexts and reflect on how such reviews contribute to the identities of both author and reviewer. 
  4. Next, through a discourse analysis of a selection of reviews from TLI, participants will identify specific rhetorical moves and language choices that encourage both rigor and persistence--that effectively support revision for better writing while also cultivating a positive identity and a sense of belonging in the SoTL community. 
  5. Ultimately, workshop participants will draft a set of guiding principles for SoTL reviews. 

This workshop welcomes participants new to SoTL or to reviewing, as well as seasoned SoTL practitioners and reviewers.


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Nancy Chick

Dr. Nancy Chick

University Chair in Teaching and Learning, University of Calgary
Nancy Chick is Academic Director of the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning and University Chair of Teaching and Learning at the University of Calgary. She is also founding co-editor of Teaching & Learning Inquiry, the journal of the International Society for the Scholarship... Read More →
GP

Gary Poole

University of British Columbia


Wednesday December 9, 2015 1:00pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room C

1:30pm EST

Using Technology to Create a Positive Feedback Approach to Procedural Learning
How much do students really retain by simply reading a laboratory protocol? This presentation will provide participants with an overview of a novel laboratory design whereby learning is blended and extended. Prior to lab, students will complete a “choose your own adventure” style online decision tree exercise. In the decision tree students are presented with a scenario, and must execute the experiment through selecting different options (such as quantities of reagent to add, order of steps, and analysis of data). Selections will lead students down different experimental “paths” where they can receive feedback on their choices. The decision tree is a formative assessment that allows students to safely “fail” before attending the wet laboratory session. Participants will learn about the pedagogy behind the course and decision tree design. They will also learn how the decision trees are built and explore the potential of using the “choose your own adventure” style of decision-making for a variety of disciplines. Participants will have the opportunity to try a decision tree exercise and are encouraged to bring their own device.

Speakers
MB

Michelle Belton

Western University
NC

Nicole Campbell

Western University
JL

Jay Loftus

Western University
SM

Sarah McLean

Western University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm EST
Meeting Room B

1:30pm EST

ACT in the University Classroom: An Investigation of Academic and Social Impacts
Levels of stress and anxiety amongst Canadian undergraduate students have increased in recent years (Booth, Sharma, & Leader, 2015). University accommodations due to panic attacks, test anxiety, and ongoing anxiety have become common in this population. Considering this and the fact that students are quite unlikely to seek professional help (Coles, Coleman, & Schubert, 2015), students need some strategies to help them manage stress and anxiety. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a technique that is commonly used to manage stress and anxiety by teaching individuals to pay attention to the present moment through meditative practice. A newer intervention that incorporates mindfulness is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). It combines the use of acceptance and mindfulness strategies with commitment and behaviour change strategies that focus on a person’s values, and has been shown to help individuals and groups manage stress and anxiety, even when presented as a brief intervention. We are interested in testing whether we can reveal benefits of implementing ACT in a university classroom setting. Given the time constraints inherent in university courses, it is relevant to determine how brief an intervention can be and still be effective. Thus, we are comparing two different schedules of ACT (distributed and condensed) in two sections of the same course. Students complete the activities as a group and have an opportunity to discuss their experiences. Selected effects on test anxiety, stress, and student experience will be reported.

Speakers
SK

Sarah Kupferschmidt

Mohawk College
HP

Heather Poole

McMaster University
Heather Poole is a postdoctoral fellow at the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Heather's background is in experimental psychology.
WS

Wanda Smith

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm EST
Meeting Room A

2:00pm EST

The Question of Labs: Questions that the Possibility of Online Laboratories Raise for Accreditation and the Role of the Lab in STEM Education

In STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) and other disciplines, laboratory experiences are typically valued as opportunities for students to gain experience by applying concepts they have learned in a hands-on environment. Beyond giving a framework for the concepts, labs are seen as critical to the development of scientific and engineering problem solving skills. However, the structure and implementation of typical laboratories focus on a straight-forward procedure implementation that questions some of those basic assumptions on the utility of labs. As various possibilities for a virtual or online delivery of very similar content arise, fundamental questions around what labs are for, how they are structured and how resources should be allocated begin to gain greater importance in science and engineering education.

In this session, we will discuss the implications of transitioning laboratory experiences from a traditional physical setting to a virtual one in an online course in the context of the Faculty of Engineering at McMaster. In particular, we will examine the questions that the possibilities of going virtual raises within the context of existing simulations and other resources on the Internet. Participants will be invited to engage in a facilitated discussion on the implications of using virtual tools to substitute physical experiments. The facilitators will welcome feedback on possible assessment tools on the pedagogy and engagement nexus.


Speakers
CV

Carly Van Egdom

McMaster University
GV

Greg Van Gastel

McMaster University
AT

Ayse Turak

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm EST
Meeting Room B

2:00pm EST

Blanket Fort Pedagogy: Playing with Mad Culture to Foster Accessible, Welcoming, and Fun Learning Communities

There is an emerging emphasis on “community” in post-secondary education, with increased attention to community-engaged learning and fostering community in the classroom. However, not all students can access these versions of “community” or feel welcome in them. In particular, individualized approaches to mental health on campus that send Mad students away from community to receive treatment services and academic accommodations suggest to these students that they are not wanted in our learning “communities” as currently envisioned.

This presentation will highlight the intentional peer support community that Mad students at McMaster have been hanging out and creating since 2012, thanks to hundreds of years ofmental patient social movement organizing. In this crazy sub-community, values of accessibility, creativity, reciprocity, friendship, consent, and privacy offer different possibilities for connection and learning than traditionally found in the classroom. The co-curricular learning that occurs in the Hamilton Mad Students Collective helps protect students from inaccessible and sanist classrooms and curricula. But what if some of this community creativity spilled over into the rational/“professional” spaces of academia?

Drawing on our collective experiences as classroom and community educators, Mad(ness) Studies and Social Work Pedagogy researchers, service users, and students, this presentation will explore how neglected and subversive “fun” can open up possibilities for education. We will share how Fun Parties, blanket forts, and craftivist hallway decorations instigated by Mad students offer new ways of relating – to ourselves, to each other, to spaces, to social justice work, to academia – in the School of Social Work at McMaster University.


Speakers
AD

Alise de Bie

McMaster University
BI

Becky Idems

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm EST
Meeting Room A

2:30pm EST

Using a Classroom Response System in the Spanish Classroom: Instructor and Student Experiences

Classroom response systems (CRS, such as iClickers) are widely recognized as tools that increase attendance and participation and promote active learning in the classroom (Graham et al., 2007; Heaslip, Donovan& Cullen, 2014). CRS are largely associated with large lecture classes in the sciences and are currently underutilized in second language instruction (Cardoso, 2011; McCloskey, 2012; Serafini, 2013). To address an increased enrolment cap of 100 students in each of 7 lecture sections in 2015-2016, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese is piloting the use of a CRS (TopHat) in its first-year language course (SPA100Y). It is anticipated that this will:

  • increase student attendance and class preparation.
  • increase student participation in individual and group classroom learning activities. 
  • improve classroom management (attendance and participation monitoring)

The success of CRS use will be examined from both the learner’s and the instructor’s perspective. Their experiences are examined through (i) an anonymous survey administered to the students and (ii) open-ended oral interviews conducted with the 4 course instructors. Both groups will respond to questions regarding their perception of the effectiveness of CRS use on student learning, engagement, attendance and participation. The instructors will also evaluate whether the benefits of CRS use outweigh any additional training and increased preparation time required. The students will comment on the cost of purchasing CRS access.

This paper presents results from the initial surveys and interviews to be conducted in November, 2015 and includes an interactive presentation of TopHat where participants try out some of the available question types.

References

Cardoso, W. (2011). Learning a foreign language with a learner response system: The students' perspective. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 24(5), 393-417.

Graham, C.R., Tripp, T.R., Seawright, L., & Joeckel, G.L. (2007). Empowering or compelling reluctant participators using audience response systems. Active Learning in Higher Education8(3), 233-258.

Heaslip, G., Donovan, P., & Cullen, J. (2014). Student response systems and learner engagement in large classes. Active Learning in Higher Education, 15(1), 11-24.

McCloskey, K. (2012). Using clickers in the second-language classroom: Teaching the passé composé and imparfait in French. GSTF Journal of Law and Social Sciences (JLSS), 2(1), 235-239.

Serafini, E.J. (2013). Learner perceptions of clickers as a source of feedback in the classroom. In K. McDonough & A. Mackey (Eds.), Second language interaction in diverse educational settings (pp. 209-226). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Top Hat Monocle Inc. (2015). TopHat Interactive Teaching Platform.  Available at: https://tophat.com/

Speakers
AL

Anna Limanni

University of Toronto


Wednesday December 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room B

2:30pm EST

The Impact of Violence on Learning: Cultivating a Caring Academic Community

This short paper will address the impact of violence in the lives of students and how it affects their learning, their sense of academic potential and vision for their future. Session participants will be invited to engage with how we as teachers and administrators can collaborate to create learning environments that are responsive and flexible in addressing students' diverse learning needs.

Over the past two decases there has been an increased commitment to create safe university and college campuses and to address issues of violence in intimate or dating relationships. Yet little has been done proactively to acknowledge and address the needs of students who have experienced violence in their home. Women students and those who identify as LGBTTQ are particualrly affected by the trauma of violence in their lives. They are often not able to concentrate, complete assignments, feel confident or engage in class or co-curricular activities

Teachers are often the first people students share their experience with, yet we are not trained to response to such trauma. Responding to the harm and violence in students' lives is critical to the success of our increasingly diverse student populations - it's a new dimension to our roles in cultivating a welcoming and comprehensive learning community.


Speakers
CG

Connie Guberman

University of Toronto - Scarborough


Wednesday December 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room A

3:00pm EST

3:20pm EST

Fostering Creativity Within and Amongst Disciplinary Communities

Several authors have suggested that disciplinary cultures play an important role in shaping the teaching and learning practices of their members (Fanghanel 2013; Mårtensson, Roxå & Olsson 2011). Trowler (2008), for instance, argues that disciplines create powerful ‘teaching and learning regimes’ (TLRs) that govern pedagogical values, emphases, and approaches. This study seeks to explore the extent to which such TLRs influence the teaching and learning of creativity.

It is often asserted that universities have an obligation to foster creativity in their students (Walsh et al., 2013; Zacher & Johnson, 2014), yet studies have shown that creativity is only rarely incorporated into courses and curricula as an intentionally facilitated learning outcome (Jackson, 2008, Authors 2012; Authors 2015). By conducting an examination of undergraduate course outlines, this research provides a preliminary picture of the extent to which this finding holds across disciplinary communities at one institution. Using a modified version of an analytical tool developed by Jackson & Shaw (2006), we conducted a close reading of all publicly available outlines for the 2013-14 academic year. The intent was to determine how commonly instructors named creativity or related constructs amongst their learning objectives or assessment criteria, and whether the frequency of these references varied across disciplines, levels, and class structures. We also scrutinized the outlines for information about how, if at all, creativity is taught and assessed in these contexts. This presentation will discuss the results and limitations of this study, and encourage attendees to consider the place of creativity within their own institutional and disciplinary communities.


Speakers
AL

Alex Liu

McMaster University
avatar for Elizabeth Marquis

Elizabeth Marquis

McMaster University
Beth Marquis is an Assistant Professor in the Arts & Science Program and the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL).
KR

Kaila Radan

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 3:20pm - 3:50pm EST
Meeting Room A

3:20pm EST

Interdisciplinary and Disciplinary Specific Programming: Graduate Student Perspectives and Relevance for Teaching Development

Context: Interdisciplinary (i.e. University-wide programming) and discipline-specific (i.e. training open students from one field) teaching development programs have been used for many years in higher education. Currently, research on the benefits of these teaching models remains scant in terms of a contextualized and operationalized understanding. To fill this gap, empirical studies are needed. The purpose of this study was to determine graduate students’ perspectives related to interdisciplinary and discipline-specific teaching and learning experiences.

Method: There were two online surveys created with Qualtrics software and distributed at different points throughout the research process: a quantitative pilot survey and a qualitative follow-up survey. Three participatory focus groups with graduate students were conducted to allow for further in-depth exploration in both an interdisciplinary and discipline-specific group setting that represented 7 distinct colleges/ faculties at a mid-sized, comprehensive university in Ontario. The number of graduate student responses included: (a) 177: quantitative survey, (b) 48: qualitative survey, and (c) 13: focus group discussions.

Results: Similar themes emerged from the survey and focus group data identifying perceived benefits of participation in either interdisciplinary or discipline-specific training. Participants’ perceived benefits were related to: (a) conditions for learning, (b) networking, and (c) their own teacher identity. The lived experiences of graduate student participants expand the characterization of interdisciplinary and discipline-specific programming. This empirical study points to the need for graduate student programs (specifically teaching development offered by educational development units) to provide both interdisciplinary and discipline-specific teaching development opportunities that achieve a blend of perceived benefits.

Speakers
EA

Erin Aspenlieder

University of Guelph
KB

Katherine Bishop-Williams

PhD Student, University of Guelph
Katherine Bishop-Williams is a PhD Student at the University of Guelph, in the department of Population Medicine. Katherine is currently the College Lead for the Ontario Veterinary College, offering workshops and resources for graduate teaching development. Katherine is also... Read More →
avatar for Kaitlin Roke

Kaitlin Roke

PhD Candidate, University of Guelph
Kaitlin Roke is a PhD Candidate at the University of Guelph, in the department of Human Health and Nutritional Science. Kaitlin also worked with the department of Open Learning and Educational Support as one of the Graduate Teaching Community Co-Chairs.
MT

Meagan Troop

University of Guelph


Wednesday December 9, 2015 3:20pm - 3:50pm EST
Meeting Room D

3:20pm EST

Crafting Indigenous - Settler Alliances for Social Work Education

The School of Social Work at McMaster University is committed to improving our capacity to incorporate indigenous approaches to social work.  In 2014 we began a process of gathering interested faculty (both full-time and sessional) to discuss how we might build capacity and reconciliation among instructors  in  the  McMaster  School  of  Social  Work  for  teaching  and learning about Indigenous-Settler relations;  and  to  enhance  instructors’  abilities  to  appropriately  integrate  Indigenous  practices  of  healing, helping, community building and activism into the curriculum.   As with so many such initiatives, the stated intentions are one thing... the actualities are another, more provocative and more complicated.

In this presentation we reflect on our learning during our involvement in the process of planning monthly gatherings for seventeen (full and part time) social work instructors. We will talk about our dual paths as an indigenous person and a settler as we have tried to navigate the complications of an historical relationship that continues to impact our capacities to teach and learn.  The emphasis in this presentation will not be on objectives and destinations but rather the relational work that must be done in order to even realistically begin to think about how we can incorporate indigenous ways of knowing, doing and being.


Speakers
BF

Bonnie Freeman

McMaster University
SP

Sandra Preston

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 3:20pm - 3:50pm EST
Meeting Room B

3:50pm EST

Picturing Wellness: From Adversity to Resilience
In Ontario, health care professionals are mandated to report suspected cases of child maltreatment. Yet, there is no standardized training in child maltreatment nor mandatory reporting for the pre-service professional. We will outline the evidence-based rationale for a McMaster-developed innovative arts-based course on child maltreatment for medical undergraduate students. We will describe course content, focusing on how the skills learned through art observation can be transferred to the clinical work of identifying and managing cases of child maltreatment. We will focus on the cognitive processing elements that are common to both art appreciation and clinical decision-making. The perspective of a course participant will be explored, along with the impact of the unique arts-based child maltreatment-related teaching on his work in the clinical setting. Finally, the results of before/after cognitive tests done by participants will be presented, illustrating the development of maltreatment-related knowledge and clinical observation and communication skills. We will end by describing the benefits of incorporating arts-based education into other areas of the clinical curriculum and the ways in which this has been done to date.

Speakers
NK

Nicole Knibb

McMaster University
MO

Michael Obeda

McMaster University
MS

Margaret Shkimba

McMaster University
CW

Christine Wekerle

McMaster University
DZ

Dena Zeraatkar

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 3:50pm - 4:20pm EST
Meeting Room A

3:50pm EST

Formation and Evaluation of McMaster's New Teaching and Learning Certificate Program
In the spring of 2015, the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL), in partnership with the School of Graduate Studies (SGS), launched the new Teaching and Learning Certificate Program for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows at McMaster University. This session will provide an overview of how the program was originally envisioned and how it was later implemented. It will also describe the process used to evaluate: (1) students' perceptions of the program, and (2) students' achievement of the program's intended learning outcomes. As a number of evaluation-related challenges have arisen, attendees will be lead in small group discussions in order to brainstorm possible strategies for improving the program's evaluation process. The hope is that this process will help to ensure that the program is of high quality and that it continues to work towards building a strong inter- and trans-disciplinary teaching and learning community among McMaster graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Erin Allard

Dr. Erin Allard

Educational Developer, McMaster University
Dr. Erin Allard is an Educational Developer and Program Area Lead for the Emerging Educators portfolio at the Paul R. MacPherson Institute for Leadership, Innovation, and Excellence in Teaching at McMaster University, where she has worked since 2012. Her work primarily centers around... Read More →
RH

Rayna H. Friendly

McMaster University
RL

Rebecca Lee

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 3:50pm - 4:20pm EST
Meeting Room D

3:50pm EST

Social Networks: The Invisible Boundary of Education
Community binds, but community also serves a boundary function. The latter is much less understood in the education context than the former. Canadian education is socially mediated. Not only is social interaction/connection a built-in element of the teaching/learning process, it is also a channel by which resources and opportunities are transmitted. However, social connection tends to be thought of individualistically, as if it is purely a personal choice. Yet gaining access to social networks is a negotiation process in which social differences, such as race, class, and gender, are often magnified and reproduced. This makes social connection a fertile ground for understanding how social boundaries are enacted to reproduce privilege and marginalization. In this presentation, I draw on my doctoral study that examines Chinese students’ experience in six Canadian post-secondary education institutions. Parts of the findings about students’ experience in micro-level interaction, which is integral to the education process, speak to social connection as the invisible boundary that shapes participation, opportunity, aspiration and trajectory. I focus on Bourdieu’s concepts of culture and transubstantiation. Culture makes visible the less perceptible boundary mechanisms embedded in the implicit system of meanings and values that underpins the Western learning culture. Transubstantiation underscores how cultural mediation of social connection reproduces inequity. This presentation stimulates thinking about the presumed neutral and benign role social interaction/connection plays in the education process. Making visible the invisible boundary of social interaction/connection has implications on building capacities for both instructors and students.


Speakers
WL

Winnie Lo

McMaster University


Wednesday December 9, 2015 3:50pm - 4:20pm EST
Meeting Room B
 
Thursday, December 10
 

9:00am EST

Welcome
Thursday December 10, 2015 9:00am - 9:15am EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

9:15am EST

Keynote Presentation by Mavis Morton

Fit or foil? Aligning principles of community engagement and pedagogical best practices through community engaged learning and SOTL

This presentation will highlight the foundational principles of community engaged scholarship (CES) and illustrate ways in which these principles both guide and are challenged in community engaged learning (CEL) and in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SOTL). Examples of CEL used in a large first year undergraduate course as well as in 4th year seminar courses will be provided. Research on some of the benefits and challenges of CEL for community partners, students, teaching assistants and faculty will be reviewed as well as Dr. Morton’s preliminary research findings related to a new model of CEL called “Community Focused Learning”.  Examples of other SOTL projects connected with the University of Guelph will also be highlighted. Experiences and insights from conference participants will be sought via questions about how to balance and align principles of CES (i.e. community identified need, mutual benefit & reciprocity, social change) pedagogical best practices (i.e. Constructive Alignment, High Impact Practices, Authentic Assessment) and the scholarship of teaching and learning.

 
Bio:

Dr. Mavis Morton, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology and a Faculty Affiliate with the Community Engaged Scholarship Institute (CESI) at the University of Guelph. She is a community engaged scholar and has worked for 25 years with rural and urban community partners on issues related to violence against women and their children and other social justice issues. Other areas of interest and focus include feminist criminology, criminal justice and social policy, feminist participatory action research (FPAR), community based participatory research (CBPR), the scholarship of teaching and learning and community-engaged learning (CEL). She integrates CEL into all of her junior and senior undergraduate courses. For this work she received the UGFA Distinguished Professor Award for Innovation in Teaching in 2014.


Speakers
avatar for Mavis Morton

Mavis Morton

Associate Professor, University of Guelph
Community engaged scholarship including community engaged learning (CEL) and "Community Focused Learning" which is a model of CEL I developed as a way to introduce first year students (in large undergraduate courses) to CES.


Thursday December 10, 2015 9:15am - 10:35am EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

10:35am EST

11:00am EST

Teaching Squares: Building Community One Square at a Time
The Teaching Squares program is designed to improve teaching skills and build community through a nonthreatening process of classroom observation and shared reflection. The process involves the best aspect of peer evaluation — observation and discussion — while excluding judgment and evaluation. Participants in a square learn about the best practices of other faculty in order to improve their own teaching.This study was undertaken to investigate whether a peer-based educational development program (Teaching Squares) involving classroom observation, analysis, reflection and discussion can shift instructors towards more student-focused approaches to teaching.  Teaching Squares participants (instructors from the University of Waterloo) were asked to complete online surveys containing both quantitative and qualitative measures. The first survey was completed shortly after the final debrief meeting and the second survey will be administered after the participant’s next teaching term(this may be anywhere from 4 to 12 months later). This session will present the findings to date.

Speakers
avatar for Monica Vesely

Monica Vesely

Instructional Developer, University of Waterloo
I am keenly interested in peer-based teaching development approaches such as Teaching Squares and the Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW). If you have experiences to share, questions to pose or if you would just like to exchange ideas, I would be delighted to chat with you.


Thursday December 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am EST
Meeting Room C

11:00am EST

Students' Motivation and Engagement Does not Influence Their Retention of Knowledge in a Subsequent Term
There are currently a number of studies investigating the role of motivation and/or engagement on short-term student learning success, however these studies fail to provide information relating to long-term student learning or students’ retention of knowledge following the completion of a course.  To fill these current gaps in the literature, this study utilized Self-Determination Theory and various scales of engagement to examine the relationship between student motivation and/or engagement and the retention of course knowledge eight and twelve weeks following a final course exam amongst ninety-six first year kinesiology students from an Ontario university.  To measure knowledge retention, students were asked to answer a series of questions that were identical to those administered on the final examination in the previous semester. The difference between scores on the final exam and on the questionnaires required in the data collection time points in the subsequent semester were used to represent knowledge retention. Through the use of paired-samples T-Tests, bivariate correlations, and multiple regression analysis it was determined that students did not remember a significant amount of knowledge and that this loss of knowledge could not be explained by student motivation, engagement, or the additive influence of both construct together.  The findings of this study show that student motivation and course engagement following a course may have limited impact on long-term learning outcomes.

Speakers
SB

Stefanie Bronson

University of Toronto


Thursday December 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am EST
Meeting Room B

11:00am EST

Collaborative Assessment: Research and Implementation Across Faculties at McMaster

Students and instructors typically view tests as dreaded but necessary tools for assessment, with little or no intrinsic learning value. Yet an accumulating body of research indicates that test-taking is a potent pedagogical tool from both a formative and summative perspective. In particular, two-stage collaborative testing, wherein students 1) complete a test alone as they normally would, then 2) form small groups to discuss the same questions and resubmit answers for credit, has recently received much attention from researchers and instructors alike. Each stage contributes to a student’s total test score; generally, the individual stage is more heavily weighted to allay fears of “social loafing”.  This collaborative testing format has many advantages over traditional individual testing. Namely, students are incentivized to consider peer feedback while the information is still fresh in memory, learn to effectively convey their logic to others, and gain the opportunity to incorporate many different perspectives on the same topic. At McMaster alone, collaborative testing has been successfully implemented across a range of grade levels, course sizes, and disciplines, including Engineering, Kinesiology, Nursing, Physics, and Psychology—bringing together instructors from different disciplines to collaborate and refine the theory behind collaborative testing while enhancing the experience from a student viewpoint. Qualitative reviews from students are overwhelmingly positive.

In this presentation, we will introduce the background, context, and theory behind collaborative testing, and discuss the findings from a number of collaborative testing initiatives and related studies that have been undertaken recently at McMaster.

Speakers
RC

Robert Cockcroft

McMaster University
KD

Kevin Dunn

McMaster University
JK

Joe Kim

McMaster University
SK

Sabrina Kirby

McMaster University
AL

Andrew LoGiudice

McMaster University
TM

Terry McCurdy

McMaster University
KV

Kim Volterman

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am EST
Meeting Room A

11:30am EST

The Globalization of Medical Education: Creating Partnerships to Introduce the Professional Competencies Curriculum into an Indian Medical University
This paper serves as the academic reasoning behind a research initiative aimed at translating curricular content from the Professional Competencies program at the Michael DeGroote School of Medicine into applicable and useful course material for Indian medical students at King George Medical University, Lucknow, U.P.  The globalization of medical education is resulting in an increasing value being placed on curricular content in domains such as ethics, professionalism and communication skills.  Also, Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is coming into widespread use worldwide, and is particularly useful for teaching this type of curricular material. This paper will provide the research and rationale behind the process of adapting curricular content developed at McMaster to the context of an Indian medical school, through both a literature review and an experiential case discussion.  A culturally competent approach is central to the success of an initiative like this, in order to ensure that the curricular material is relevant to the different clinical realities faced by Indian medical students.  A strong partnership between faculty at McMaster and King George Medical University is being developed, which will help to ensure that curricular elements of the ProComp program fit the context of Indian medical education system.

Speakers
PK

Palika Kohli

McMaster University
I just graduated from the Global Health Master's Program at McMaster University - I travelled to India for four months this summer, have researched the ProComp in India project for a year, and helped set up stage two of the project at King George's Medical University in Lucknow, Uttar... Read More →
KT

Karen Trollope-Kumar

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm EST
Meeting Room C

11:30am EST

mindJig: An Evidence Based Framework for Fostering Collaborative Communities in Large Classrooms
Students tend to learn best in collaborative settings that foster debate and discussion, yet this is very challenging to accomplish in large online classes. To this end, a tool called “mindJig” was created that serves as an “online tutorial” for students: mindJig helps students explicate some type of information, participate in debate, and work collaboratively with their peers to produce a piece of writing. The tool fosters the twenty-first century skills of communication, collaboration, critical thought, creative thought, and self-reflective thought. The high level design of the software was informed by research in pedagogical sciences, humanities, and design think; mindJig specifically makes use of Dr. Elliot Aronson’s “Jigsaw Classroom” technique, the Socratic method, and David Rosenwasser et al.’s “Notice and Focus” technique. A key focus of the tool revolves around the concept of collaborative communities: mindJig teaches students how to collaborate with individuals that offer competing perspectives of a topic on hand, teaches them how to debate about their ideas, all while learning to offer counter arguments and rebutting the feedback they receive, and also how to work as a team to produce a work of analytical writing. This tool is currently being tested in University of Toronto’s Introduction to Psychology class. In the paper presentation of this tool, participants will get to see screenshots of a sample mindJig assignment and learn how the software is faring in our pilot tests. They will also get the opportunity to learn how they can incorporate some of the pedagogical activities mindJig uses in their own classrooms, regardless of the availability of technology or budgeting.

Speakers
avatar for Aakriti Kapoor

Aakriti Kapoor

University of Toronto-Scarborough, Advanced Learning Technologies Lab


Thursday December 10, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm EST
Meeting Room B

11:30am EST

Student Engagement Through the Use of a Novel Assessment and Instructional Strategy
A newly developed pedagogical strategy, here referred to as the Graded Response Method (GRM), was applied to a second year Geography course and its impact on student engagement and the promotion of a learning centered environment was assessed. The GRM assessment resembles a multiple choice question except that the choices (i.e., possible responses) require ranking from best to worst. The premise is that students must not only be aware of the rationale to support a correct answer but must also be able to recognize why other options are less appropriate. In addition, the GRM was also assessed for its value as an instructional tool. The method for the delivery of the GRM along with strategies for providing formative feedback will be highlighted. A key approach involved opportunities, during tutorials, aimed at encouraging students to develop their own rationale for the ranking of responses; participation in open discussions with course TAs was actively encouraged. These discussions were meant to serve as a formative means of supporting student learning.  Focus group and survey findings suggest that students’ engagement skills were enhanced and students were also encouraged by the opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of course material. Our primary conclusions are: 1- The GRM empowered students to become active contributors in their own learning community & 2- The GRM engaged students in a manner that contributed to the enhancement of course specific skills, in a manner that exemplifies the SoTL philosophy and which supports the promotion of critical thinking skills.

Speakers
CA

Cristian Altobelli

University of Toronto - Mississauga
MD

Michael deBraga

University of Toronto - Mississauga
NL

Nicole Laliberte

University of Toronto - Mississauga
Nicole Laliberte is an Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream in the Department of Geography at the University of Toronto Mississauga. John Paul Catungal is a Lecturer at the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia.


Thursday December 10, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm EST
Meeting Room A

12:00pm EST

Lunch
Thursday December 10, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

1:00pm EST

Women Transforming the World/Students and Instructors Transforming the Curriculum: Student Activism and Community Engaged Learning in Level One Women's Studies at McMaster University
Over the last three years, McMaster University has been working toward a new mission for the university structured around Community Engaged Education, Internationalization and Local-Global Connections. This research team conducted an intensive exploration of community engaged learning and student activism as it currently takes place in inside Women’s Studies 1AA3: Women Transforming the World.  WS 1AA3, taught by the faculty member on this research team, enrolls approx. 200 students per year in a course designed as an introduction to the basic terms of women’s and gender studies, with an emphasis on activism and on local-global connections. Students in this class are introduced to feminist activism through reading material generated by feminist organizations, through assignments which direct students to attend activist events on campus and in the community, through community activists leading the class, and though an optional activism project.  Each term approx. 40% of the students in the class undertake a short-term (10-15 hour commitment) activist project in lieu of the traditional research paper. Our research team is evaluated the student activism component of the course as it related to: 1) the existing academic literature on student activism in women’s studies classes (notably the critique in Dean, 2007); 2) the communication of ethical standards in activist work and the principles of responsible partnership with community organizations; 3) the benefits of introducing students to activism that breaks the border between the university and the wider world.

Speakers
KB

Karen Balcom

McMaster University
JG

Julie Gouweloos

McMaster University
KK

Katherine Killam

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm EST
Meeting Room A

1:00pm EST

How Do Students' Perceptions of SCIENCE 1A03 Compare Over Time?
The course SCIENCE 1A03 “Investigating Science: Opportunities and Experiences” was offered inaugurally in Fall 2014 to ~150 Level 1 students in the Faculty of Science, and it has been offered again during the Fall 2015 term. The goals of SCIENCE 1A03 include the following:
  1. engaging students with different fields of scientific research at the university;
  2. introducing students to scientific methodologies, reasoning and thought processes; and
  3. developing skills applicable to their undergraduate degrees and beyond.
To help achieve these goals, Level 1 students are peer-mentored by upper-level students in a parallel course, SCIENCE 3A03 (see also abstract titled “The Impact of Peer Mentoring on Mentors in a Novel Course at McMaster University” by Haqqee, Huang, Goff and Knorr).

The aim of our pedagogical research study is to understand the SCIENCE 1A03’s impact on students and their perception of this course. Through pre- and post-surveys, and follow-up interviews, we are analysing how SCIENCE 1A03 has changed students’ attitudes and approaches towards science - and how these may be different from discipline to discipline.

Speakers
RC

Robert Cockcroft

McMaster University
KG

Kaitlyn Gonsalves

McMaster University
SH

Susan He

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm EST
Meeting Room B

1:00pm EST

Action Learning Sets: How to Cultivate a SoTL Research Community (2-hour workshop)

In this interactive session, we will provide a detailed guide to Action Learning Sets  (McGill and Brockbank, 2004). Action Learning Sets (ALS) is a structured approach designed to support groups of 5 to 7 people who are working on individual or institutional problems. Participants support each other in finding solutions to what might otherwise seem intractable problems while at the same time building community using a sustainable approach. The same approach may be used with students in a classroom or with faculty in a professional development session or in senior management fora.

We will take participants through an ALS cycle so that they experience the process for themselves. We will facilitate discussion of the benefits, pitfalls and potential problems that ALS may involve before closing with an overview of examples of ALS in action, in particular with regard to cultivating a SoTL research community.

We will invite participants to take part in a research project in which anyone who chooses to implement ALS in their institution will be able to take part in an evaluative study of the efficacy of ALS in Canadian institutions.

For this hands-on session we will require a computer with PowerPoint, internet connection, and audio.

References

McGill, I. and A. Brockbank (2004) The Action Learning Handbook, London, Routledge  Falmer.


Speakers
MF

Mandy Frake-Mistak

York University
Mandy Frake-Mistak (Session Organizer/Chair): Educational developer with the Teaching Commons at York University. With a research background in the political economy of HE, and as an ISW Trainer and Facilitator, she leads faculty courses/workshops on teaching and SoTL, and co-leads... Read More →
avatar for Genevieve Maheux-Pelletier

Genevieve Maheux-Pelletier

Educational Developer, York University
avatar for Celia Popovic

Celia Popovic

Director Teaching Commons, York University
Susan Vail, associate vice-president teaching and learning at York University, has announced that Celia Popovic has been appointed to the position of director of York University’s Teaching Commons.“I am so pleased that Dr. Popovic will now have the opportunity to share her pedagogical... Read More →


Thursday December 10, 2015 1:00pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room 5

1:00pm EST

Learning Before Interdisciplinary and Intersectoral Collaboration (2-hour workshop)
Interagency and intersectoral collaboration in the workplace, is often a solution to complex problems that an individual organization cannot solve alone. Providing students experiential learning opportunities specific to interagency collaboration is necessary to cultivating their capacity to support and navigate diverse workplace experiences. This workshop explores a Master of Education Capstone action research findings, exploring the elements of ‘learning how to successfully work within interagency collaboration.’ Research data results revealed that interagency collaboration requires learning specific skills, as an element for success and sustainability. The facilitator combines academic research with experiential knowledge as the ‘Director of Collaborative Partnerships & Education’ at a local community organization. This interactive and participatory workshop learning can be applied within the classroom and when fostering academic and community partnerships. Incorporating constructivist and social learning theory, the fundamentals of learning how to work in collaboration include: collaborative leadership skills, collaborative communication, and bridging workplace or disciplinary cultures, and learning how to become a new ‘collaborative’ community of practice. Navigating across traditional boundaries between disciplines, departments or organizations often requires flexible and spontaneous ‘learning by doing’ and possible ‘rule bending’ which will be explored within this engaging two hour workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Patricia Regier

Patricia Regier

Director of Collaborative Partnerships & Education, Community Support Services Niagara
I am passionate about collaborative partnerships, experiential learning, community health promotion and quality adult education. I facilitate learning in a variety of contexts including: community, organizational and academic settings. Experience building collaborative projects/programs... Read More →


Thursday December 10, 2015 1:00pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room 2

1:00pm EST

Teaching and Learning through Social Arts: Creating Relational Spaces of Community Within the Classroom (2-hour workshop)

Our relationships with those we teach and learn from are often pushed into limited spaces in which our relational dynamics – listening, collaborating, awareness - become more routine and technical and less embodied and meaningful; we often see these dynamics as inherent to our work, allowing them to go unnoticed and become disengaged.   When our relationships with learners, teachers and community members are created and remain within this limited and inactive space, the rich complexities of human life and the many different ways of understanding the world and our relationships, are marginalized.

I will use arts-based practices, particularly improvisation, to provide an experience that allows us to make active the relational dynamics that have become the routine parts of being with people - in the classroom and in community settings. Engaging with the creative, un-scripted, in the moment, foundations of improvisation can challenge us to go outside of a limited way of understanding, experiencing relational dynamics as an active way into connection.  I am proposing a workshop that uses improv-based exercises and discussions to explore different ways of understanding everyday concepts of relating; in particular, the concepts of support, collaboration and awareness. This artful engagement results in meaningful experiences and discussions that connect personal reflection, relational dynamics, and larger, social change.

Rather than introducing a specific approach to teaching or a particular method of community-building, this research-informed workshop encourages a reflexive, active, and dialogic exploration between the facilitator and the participants and provides a reflexive and engaging approach to relational dynamics.


Speakers
CP

Cathy Paton

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 1:00pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room D

1:00pm EST

Why Do It Alone?: Finding and Collaborating with a Teaching Community (2-hour workshop)

For early career higher education instructors, teaching in a large institution can be a solitary task. Although we are surrounded by other teachers, we often find ourselves working alone, unable to access learning and teaching communities developed for both students and full time faculty members. This is especially true of educators in positions of precarious employment—an increasingly significant proportion of the teaching staff at most large universities.

This workshop will use games, structured small group discussions, and collaborative brainstorming to provide some hands-on strategies for building a community that can support and enrich the teaching approaches of early career educators. We will also explore and test a framework for putting that community to work in a collaborative way.

Participants will address the following questions: what are the strengths and weaknesses of working together, what kind of teaching work best lends itself to collaborative approaches, and how can you ensure that the process goes smoothly and has great results?

By the end of the workshop, participants will have practiced on the spot community building, analyzed factors that contribute to a successful collaboration within a community, and created a plan for collaboration that is specific to their own teaching context.


Speakers
SK

Sasha Kovacs

University of Toronto
RS

Robin Sutherland-Harris

University of Toronto


Thursday December 10, 2015 1:00pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room C

1:30pm EST

Students: Building Links Between Communities and Higher Education

In service-learning courses, students play a vital role as active community researchers through application of praxis. Intentions of service-learning education serves as pedagogical means to amplify student learning through implementation of their studies into practice. As active learners in the community, students generate application of praxis and adopt community based knowledge. Through course assigned reflection activities, students can apply knowledge from communities back to the University. Fueling dual roles as a University student and active community agent, students can serve as a medium to reversing praxis by rotating practice back into theory; acting as producers of knowledge. Through reflection and conceptualization of their field learning experience, students can generate community knowledge and bring it back into the University and inform curriculum of community initiatives and agency.

For this paper, I aim to distinguish the role of students as knowledge producers. Students who share their experiences to peers and faculty members amplify community-based knowledge didactically and reflectively back into the institution. To demonstrate this, I will interview instructors of service-learning courses on how their course curriculum stimulates student reflection of their community learning and how students are able to reflect their experience back to the classroom. I aim to analyze whether students play a vital role of bridging field knowledge back to the University through reflective learning experiences.


Speakers
avatar for Karen Kus

Karen Kus

University of Toronto - Mississauga


Thursday December 10, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm EST
Meeting Room A

1:30pm EST

The Impact of Peer Mentoring on Mentors in a Novel Course at McMaster University
In a peer mentoring relationship, mentors can offer strong peer support and can help foster academic networks and a sense of community for their mentees. Mentors act as a guide, transferring valuable advice for overall success in academia. In return, mentors should also expect to benefit through self-reflection, leading to a sense of personal growth (Colvin & Ashman, 2010). The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of a new third year McMaster undergraduate course, Peer Mentoring in Science (SCIENCE 3A03), on student mentors and their perceptions and experiences of mentorship. During December 2014, we collected survey data from peer mentors on their experiences mentoring first-year students that were registered in a new foundational science course. Surveys consisted of Likert scales and open-ended responses on impressions of how the SCIENCE 3A03 course assisted their development as mentors. More specifically, we explored the challenges, usefulness, and enjoyability of mentorship, as well as mentors’ perspectives of impact. Results from this study will improve the current peer mentoring course design, provide a model of a peer mentoring program that can be adopted by other faculties and institutions, and contribute to the development of a stronger student community. Participants will be asked to consider how a mentoring program might help cultivate a sense of community and bring benefits to students' learning experiences within their own department or faculty.

Speakers
LG

Lori Goff

McMaster University
Lori Goff is the Manager of Program Enhancement at McMaster University. Her research interests in peer mentoring and quality enhancement are fundamentally focused on enhancing students’ learning experiences within the university context
ZH

Zeeshan Haqqee

McMaster University
KM

Keeyeon Mark Hwang

McMaster University
avatar for Kris Knorr

Kris Knorr

RTL Conference Chair, McMaster University
Kris Knorr is a research coordinator at MIIETL


Thursday December 10, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm EST
Meeting Room B

2:00pm EST

Teaching Real Research through Experience: Undergraduate Learning in Hamilton Community-based Environmental Projects

The SOTL literature suggests that undergraduate education – especially in less “accessible” areas such as research methods – benefits from application of “real” projects involving experential models tied to communities outside the university. The literature supporting these models emerged first in the work of John Dewey (1938) and has been developed around PSE more recently (c.f. Hamilton, 1980; Smith 2001, and Kolb and Kolb, 2005).

Starting in 2010, 60-100 students in the McMaster University Communication Studies core 2nd year research courses have participated annually in a range of qualitative and quantitative research on the communication outcomes of education components of local school boards in partnership with a local environmental group (BARC). The pedagogical process of learning and applying social research methods involved a re-focusing of course delivery, the development of instructor and graduate students teaching teams, and a range of institutional community relationships.

Evidence shows that students conducting experiential community research were more engaged in designing and executing a mix of social research techniques such as surveys, in-depth interviews, focus groups, and textual analysis when they worked with community partners (alongside faculty and graduate students conducting their own related research). 

This short presentation will tell the story of the process and outcomes in terms of teaching & learning best practices and improvements over a five-year period of implementation and development. It will be led jointly by faculty member Dr Philip Savage in conjunction with two recent CSMM MA graduates, Mr. Steve Watts and Mr Tom Wiercioch (who also at different points acted as TA’s in CMST 2A03/2B03). Follow up discussion will be moderated to discuss audience members' own experiences with similar projects.


Speakers
PS

Philip Savage

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm EST
Meeting Room A

2:00pm EST

Do Student-led Tutorials Translate Across Student Years?

Objective:

To investigate the effectiveness and utility of the peer-to-peer model of student-led tutorial (SLT) as a learning strategy to build knowledge and skills for pharmacy students across various years.

Methods:

Year 4 pharmacy students delivered SLTs on infectious diseases, patient self-care and cardiovascular diseases online and live to both third- and fourth-year students in preparation for their experiential placements and the licensing exam. Retrospective self-assessment surveys were administered after each session. Five knowledge domains were assessed. A paired t-test was utilized to evaluate the survey data. Thematic analysis was applied to the qualitative comments on the survey.

Results:

A total of 81 students comprised of third and fourth year students responded to the survey. Prior to the SLTs, 46.8% of students rated their knowledge ‘Average’ (3 of 5) while 33.1% rated their knowledge ‘Above Average’ (4 of 5) in all knowledge domains. After the SLTs, 53.6% of students rated their knowledge to be ‘Above Average’ (4 of 5), while 27.5% rated ‘Excellent’ (5 of 5) in all knowledge domains. There was a statistically significant increase (p≤0.01) in all five knowledge domains post-SLTs for both third- and fourth-year students. Useful components of the SLTs were drug charts and case discussions.

Conclusions:

The SLT was an effective learning strategy for students across third and fourth year.  Students perceived an increased level of therapeutic knowledge after attending the SLTs. Student presenters developed public speaking skills while consolidating knowledge.  The peer-to-peer mentoring model is beneficial for student life-long learning and professional practice.


Speakers
AW

Annie Wai-Mun Lee

University of Toronto


Thursday December 10, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm EST
Meeting Room B

2:30pm EST

Supporting Student Research through the BHSc Research Ethics Mentors
Can undergraduates complete student intitiated research projects?  While many students are inclinded, often adminstrative and research ethics requirments can hamper the completion of the project within the framework of an academic semester.  This presentation will describe a student-led research ethics practicum that fosters an awareness of ethics and research ethics requirement for a community of undergraduate learners in the Bachelor of Health Sciences program at McMaster University.  We will also explore strategies that focus on research ethics as academic learning goal and less of an administrative requirement.

Speakers
KT

Kristina Trim

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm EST
Meeting Room B

3:00pm EST

A New Approach to Evaluating Information: A Reflection on RADAR (Poster)

For instruction librarians, teaching information literacy (IL) skills is often an important aspect of any lesson plan. One area of IL includes the critical evaluation of sources, an essential skill that students need to succeed as aspiring scholars and researchers. This ability to differentiate “good” from “bad” information is beneficial to students beyond their academic careers, and will help them navigate the “sea of information” for the rest of their lives. Typically, such evaluation skills are taught through applying the CRAAP test: Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, and Purpose. While humorous and memorable, the name of this test devalues the usefulness of IL and falls into the realm of “edutainment”.

An alternative - the RADAR test - sounds more serious, has more value as a research tool, and is both a memorable acronym and palindrome. The RADAR framework was conceptualized by Jane Mandailos of the American College of Greece, and it stands for Relevance, Authority, Date, Appearance, and Reason for Writing (2013). We taught RADAR as the framework for evaluating sources in a series of one-shot IL workshops, and assessed students’ reactions during the session as well as through a workshop assessment tool. We will present our findings on this framework for evaluating sources through an informal, anecdotal poster session, with suggestions and plans for future research. With the pervasiveness of misinformation and the rise of Web 2.0, information literacy is more important now than ever, and we must conceptualize that by framing it as a serious and important research skill.

 

Mandalios, J. (2013). RADAR: An approach for helping students evaluate Internet sources. Journal of Information Science, 39(4), 470–478


Speakers
avatar for Kim McPhee

Kim McPhee

Head, Teaching and Learning, Western University
Kim McPhee is Head, Teaching & Learning at Western Libraries at Western University where she leads a newly-formed team of Librarians and Library Assistants. Together, they are developing an intentional campus-wide information literacy (IL) program that will connect students to the... Read More →
KT

Kevin Tanner

Western University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Clarifying Uncertainty About Uncertainties: Exploring a Threshold Concept of Error Analysis in Introductory Physics Courses (Poster)

Uncertainty and error analysis is considered a “threshold concept” in the scientific community (i.e., a difficult but basic skill required to achieve success). However, there are relatively few studies related to undergraduate students’ understanding of this concept (Allie et al., 2008; Day et al., 2014; Holmes and Bonn, 2013; Macdonald et al., 2013). The main purpose of this study is to explore students’ understanding of data reporting, error analysis and propagation, and graphical tools. Pre- and post-surveys were conducted at the start and end of term, respectively, in three undergraduate introductory physics courses in the Physical Sciences, Integrated Sciences, and Arts and Sciences programs.  We aim to identify potential strengths and differences between these communities as they relate to physics.

The above surveys assessed students’ capabilities and confidence levels with a relatively new standardized instrument on uncertainty analysis (the Concise Data Processing Assessment; Day and Bonn, 2011) and a more-established instrument on Newtonian mechanics (the Force-Concept Inventory; Hestenes, Wells and Swackhamer, 1992; Huffman and Heller, 1995; Hake, 1998; Savinainen and Scott, 2001).  Students’ understanding of uncertainties is also compared to various other factors, including incoming high-school grades, program, and gender of the student.

We anticipate that this data will provide insights into how well students understand uncertainties and will guide future studies in the field of physics pedagogy. A deeper understanding of this area will facilitate improvements in how introductory physics classes introduce and develop the topic of uncertainties in the future, which would both encourage current students and potentially increase enrollment for future students in the physics community.

Speakers
RC

Robert Cockcroft

McMaster University
TS

Tiffany Shi

McMaster University
HW

Harrison Winch

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Community Engagement & Student Development: A Case Study in a 2nd Level Clinical Neuroscience Course in the Faculty of Science at McMaster University (Ontario, Canada) (Poster)

Community engagement is an effective pedagogical method that has been shown to have a wide range of positive impacts on student development (see review in Furco, Jones-White, Huesman & Gorny, 2012). The present study investigated the effects of community engagement on students in an undergraduate clinical neuroscience course with an enrollment of 130 students in the Faculty of Science at McMaster University. The community engagement component consisted of a mandatory group assignment called MacEngaged that required students to design and implement an outreach project in neuropsychology. Pre- and post-survey questionnaires used a 5-point Likert agreement scale to assess student perspectives under four general themes: academic enhancement and development, civic responsibility, professional and personal skill development. It was hypothesized that the community engagement experience would promote student development in all four of the themes. Based on previous research, the largest impact was expected in the areas of professional and personal skill development (Astin & Sax, 1998; Furco et al., 2012). Descriptive statistics suggested changes in 7 out of 25 categories of student development, including scores for independence, dependability, academic value, interest in course content, understanding of course content, importance of reflection, and value of reflection. Increases in the spread of post-survey agreement scores suggested that not all students found this experience to be beneficial. Findings from this preliminary study can be used to guide further areas of research and improve the course design for future offerings. 

 

Astin, A. W., & Sax, L. J. (1998). How undergraduates are affected by service participation. Journal of College Student Development39(3), 251–263. 

Furco, A., Jones-White, D., Huesman, R., & Gorny, L. (2012). Development of a model of the influence of service-learning on academic and social gains with the SERU survey.


Speakers
AK

Ayesha Khan

McMaster University
MM

Mirella Mazza

University of Toronto
PM

Paul McNicholas

McMaster University
CT

Cristina Tortora

McMaster University
DW

Deanne Wah

McMaster University
UZ

Urszula Zoladeski

McMaster University
Urszula Zoladeski is an Honours Biology student at McMaster University. The focus of her academic career is animal and human behaviour, specifically human learning and cognition. Participating in McMaster’s MacEngaged program as a second year student sparked her interest in service... Read More →


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Comparing differing perspectives on a shared experience: University administrators’ and faculty members’ perceptions of quality in Canadian higher education (Poster)

Conceptions of quality and approaches to quality assurance of academic programs have been receiving a great deal of attention both globally and locally (Altbach, 2010). Discussions surrounding quality and quality assessment at the postsecondary level are reverberating throughout the academy. With rapidly increasing student enrollment, educational stakeholders demanding greater accountability, and the increased desire for international recognition, discussions have intensified and led to the need for greater clarification with regards to how quality is defined, experienced and assessed.

This poster reports the results of two recent qualitative investigations, which focus on quality and quality assurance in Canadian higher education. These studies were conducted to better understand university administrators’ and faculty members’ conceptions of quality and experiences with institutional quality assurance processes. The following research question guided both studies: What conceptions of quality do university administrators/faculty members hold?

Aiming to explore notions of quality, both studies utilized a phenomenographic approach. Phenomenography is the “empirical study of the differing ways in which people experience, perceive, apprehend, understand, and conceptualize various phenomena in an aspect of the world around us” (Marton, 1994, 4428). To collect the qualitative data, open-ended interviews were conducted with administrators and faculty members in Ontario postsecondary institutions.

This poster outlines the background of the study and the methods utilized. Additionally, the poster will compare the results and present the two models that emerged from each study.

 

References:

Altbach, P. G. (2010). The realities of mass higher education in a globalized world. In D.B. Johnstone (Ed.), Higher education in a global society (pp. 25-41). Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar.

Marton, F. (1994) Phenomenography: A research approach to investigating the different understandings of reality. Journal of Thought, 21(3), 28-49.


Speakers
DG

Danielle Gabay

McMaster University
LG

Lori Goff

McMaster University
Lori Goff is the Manager of Program Enhancement at McMaster University. Her research interests in peer mentoring and quality enhancement are fundamentally focused on enhancing students’ learning experiences within the university context


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Cultivating diverse communities: Equity and diversity in Canada’s teaching and learning centres (Poster)

As teaching and learning centres within Canada have rapidly evolved and expanded within the last few decades, various aspects of these institutes have been researched and described, such as the history of centres, the work of staff members, and both the function and offerings which they provide. However, information has not been gathered with regards to the diversity of social identities of those personnel working within Canada’s teaching and learning support centres. Existing literature identifies the importance of diversity in postsecondary institutions and especially within teaching and learning spaces (Stanley, 2001; Mighty, Ouellett & Stanley 2010).

This current project seeks to address this gap in the literature. The study aims to explore conceptions of diversity within Canada’s teaching and learning centres, and seeks to document the various identities that are present within these organizations. More specifically, this investigation utilizes an online survey questionnaire and in-depth interviews to collect demographic data and to gather faculty, staff, student and administrators' perceptions of diversity. In addition, this exploratory, national study aims to determine areas for improving diversity and inclusivity within Canada’s teaching and learning centres, as well as put forth recommendations for future research.

As this study is a work in progress, this poster presentation will outline the background of the study, its significance, methods utilized, preliminary findings, and suggestions for future research.

 

References:

Mighty, J., Ouellett, M., and C. Stanley. (2010). Unheard voices among faculty developers. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 122, 103-112.

Stanley, C. (2001). A review of the pipeline: The value of diversity in staffing teaching and learning centers in the new millennium. Journal of Faculty Development, 18(2) 75-86.


Speakers
DG

Danielle Gabay

McMaster University
AL

Alex Liu

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Demystifying Science Education: Developing a Conceptual Model (Poster)

The potential of a life science course seminar course that was administered at McMaster on science education which focused on the significance of active and deep learning to serve as a conceptual model for post-secondary education will be analyzed in this presentation. The design and execution of the course will be explained using Seligman’s model of flourishing based on the theory of wellbeing based on five pillars- positive emotion, engagement, meaning, relationships, and accomplishment. The presentation will analyse the course using this conceptual framework focusing on students’ wellbeing in the learning process. The design of wellbeing is considered as a construct based on the positive relationship between the five major pillars and the poster will elaborate on how the course elements aligned or misaligned with the framework. By enabling them to be a part of a collaborative learning enterprise, students received the opportunity to establish a strong connection to their own learning wherein they could analyze their own strengths and weaknesses, and find value in what they did. In fact, the presentation will elaborate on how the course attempted to demystify the concept of education by proposing a shift from an authoritative paradigm where students act as passive consumers of education, to a co-operative enterprise where students act as change agents actively engaged in the development and execution of the curricula to result in phenomenally improved learning outcomes. 


Speakers
LG

Lori Goff

McMaster University
Lori Goff is the Manager of Program Enhancement at McMaster University. Her research interests in peer mentoring and quality enhancement are fundamentally focused on enhancing students’ learning experiences within the university context


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Direct Observation Tools for Clerks - A Literature Review (Poster)

Direct observation tools (DOTs) are used to help preceptors assess students’ clinical competence by systematically observing them engage in a clinical encounter. Miller’s Pyramid of Assessment (separating knowledge from competence from performance from action) provides the theoretical basis for this evaluation method. These tools allow for evaluation in natural settings, assess soft skills, minimize recall bias and improve accuracy of judgement. This literature review appraises the psychometric properties, strengths and weaknesses of DOTs to make recommendations for use in ambulatory clinical training settings.

Clinical encounter cards (CECs) are pocket-sized cards that involve 1) assessment of different competencies pertinent to a clinical encounter and 2) a single global rating on all domains assessed. Encounter cards have good validity properties and reach high reliability after only a few encounters. They have garnered support from learners and teachers due to their exceptional ability to promote formative feedback. The Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise is a frequently-used tool that requires ratings on six domains of clinical competence along with open ended feedback. It has consistently strong construct validity and reliability but is only moderately able to predict performance on other measures of competence.

Clinical encounter cards are the most reliable, valid and successful in providing formative feedback; this prompted McMaster University to create an evidence-based CEC for use in a family medicine clinical rotation. Intuitively, the CEC may be generalized for use in personal interaction training for other professionals (e.g. psychologists, social workers, project managers). Future research in these settings is necessary to corroborate this theory.

Speakers
JB

Judy Baird

McMaster University
avatar for Romesa Khalid

Romesa Khalid

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Helping Science Students with the High School-to-University Transition (Poster)

This project aims to further understand and alleviate the problems caused by the mismatch between the expectations of high school students about university and the academic realities of first year in science. This project builds upon surveys administered during the last academic year (2014/2015) that focused on the transition of students into first year.   The previous surveys will be adapted to create new surveys suitable for both the current grade 12 high-school students and first-year undergraduate students.  Using the collected survey data to inform follow-up questions, we will develop focus groups for high-school students facilitated by upper-year science mentors.  Results from all surveys and focus groups will translate into the creation of a resource guide that will eventually be distributed to the greater community - high-school students, undergraduate students, and instructors.  This presentation will describe the results from the 2014/2015 data, provide further details of the instruments being developed, and discuss our larger goals to support existing McMaster transition programs and ultimately facilitate more communication between high schools and universities.

Citations:

Bone, E. K., & Reid, R. J. (2011). Prior learning in biology at high school does not predict performance in the first year at university.Higher Education Research & Development30(6), 709–724. http://doi.org/10.1080/07294360.2010.539599

Briggs, A. R. J., Clark, J., & Hall, I. (2012). Building bridges: Understanding student transition to university. Quality in Higher Education18(1), 3–21. http://doi.org/10.1080/13538322.2011.614468

Pancer, S. M., Hunsberger, B., Pratt, M. W., & Alisat, S. (2000). Cognitive complexity of expectations and adjustment to university in the First year. Journal of Adolescent Research15(1), 38–57. http://doi.org/10.1177/0743558400151003


Speakers
CB

Chelsea Bodoe

McMaster University
RC

Robert Cockcroft

McMaster University
avatar for Patricia Kousoulas

Patricia Kousoulas

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Leveraging Resources Across Units and Universities to Address Academic Literacies and Research Skills in Ontario Graduate Students (Poster)

Student2Scholar (S2S) is a fully online and open course that aims to teach academic literacies and research skills to social science graduate students.  Set to launch in December 2015, S2S was conceived of and created by a diverse and distributed team of academic librarians, faculty, graduate students, and staff from three Ontario Universities: Western, the University of Toronto, and Queen’s.  Members of the project team brought with them varying degrees of experience and expertise across a range of disciplinary and teaching and learning backgrounds, including: adult education, information literacy, and online learning (to name only a few).

S2S serves as a standout example of what can be achieved when a teaching and learning project is resourced to leverage the time and talent of a cross-section of the academic community whose professional goals and educational interests are shared, despite working in seemingly disparate and often disconnected areas of campus or institutions of higher education.

This poster presentation will highlight the pedagogical (i.e., conceptual and theoretical) framework used in the design S2S, and make explicit the connections between the design of the course and the human resources required, and ultimately assigned to contribute to the development of the course (e.g., organizational development, design and development of modules and assets, writers, etc). Using S2S as a case study in online, module-based, interdisciplinary course development, MIIETL conference delegates will learn how to leverage established and yet-to-be formed relationships across academic units and institutions to realize mutually beneficial teaching and learning outcomes.


Speakers
avatar for Melanie Mills

Melanie Mills

Research & Instructional Services Librarian, Western University
Melanie Mills is a Research & Instructional Services Librarian at Western University, where she has worked since 2004, Melanie has supported graduate students and researchers through her various roles as a subject liaison in humanities and social science disciplines, as a sessional... Read More →
EP

Elan Paulson

Western University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

MCYU in the City: An outreach model for conducting Community Engagement (Poster)

MCYU in the City is a year-long community engagement initiative that invites undergraduate and graduate students from all Faculties at McMaster to apply their research interests to public issues (namely those inspired by the needs of Hamilton’s priority neighborhoods). Students are trained to create and facilitate inquiry-based workshops in multidisciplinary teams to children and youth in the Hamilton community. Importantly, the program provides McMaster students with training in community engagement, knowledge translation, inquiry-based learning along with significant teaching and outreach experience.

We would like to present results of our pilot study, and to discuss our research design as we move into our second year. We successfully executed our first ‘MCYU in the City’ event in May 2015 in the Hamilton community of McQuesten with much acclaim from families. Approximately 20 McMaster undergraduate and graduate students presented their inquiry based workshops to approximately 60 students from neighbourhoods across Hamilton.

This is a new model of outreach for conducting community engagement, as we are the first Canadian university that is apart of the European Children's University Network. MCYU in the City is the also the only institution in the network to train students to develop and deliver their workshops as an outreach initiative. Our program is working in collaboration with MIIETL, to develop our research design. As MCYU in the City moves into its second year, the program will be expanding into more Hamilton neighbourhoods, increasing McMaster student involvement, with a vision to empowering students by demonstrating the value of their education using workshop development and community engagement.


Speakers
JE

Julia Evanovitch

McMaster University
avatar for Beth Levinson

Beth Levinson

Educational Developer, McMaster University
Beth Levinson is an Educational Developer at the Paul R. MacPherson Institute for Leadership, Innovation, and Excellence in Teaching at McMaster University where she has worked since 2014. Beth’s focus is on developing community engaged initiatives and Experiential Education. She... Read More →
DM

Danielle Martak

McMaster University
SR

Sandeep Raha

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

One Week, Many Ripples: Measuring the Impacts of the McMaster Fall Break on Student Stress Physiology (Poster)
Over the past decade, universities and colleges across Canada have introduced a fall break into their term calendars with the goal of reducing student stress and increasing student retention and success. Such effects could be expected to allow students to be more active and enduring participants in their university community and experience. In 2015, a full-week fall break was introduced at McMaster University. In spite of the increasing adoption of a fall break in post-secondary institutions across Canada, there is no published research investigating whether implementing a fall break successfully meets the goal of decreasing student stress. In this study, we are evaluating student stress through surveys, focus groups, and cortisol levels. Here, we report on the pattern of results in cortisol, which is a physiological marker of stress that can be extracted from saliva. Undergraduate students at McMaster were asked to collect saliva in the week before the fall break and the week after the fall break. To provide a control group, students at McGill University, which does not have a fall break, were asked to do the same. Levels of cortisol were compared to measure stress levels between and within each group. If the fall break is effective at lowering student stress, cortisol levels should be a) lower after the fall break than before the fall break in McMaster students, and b) more consistent in McGill students than McMaster students. Results could support future evidence based decision-making regarding the fall break, both at McMaster and at other Canadian post-secondary institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Agnew

Michael Agnew

Postdoctoral Fellow, McMaster University
Michael Agnew is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) at McMaster University. He received his PhD in Religious Studies from McMaster University in 2015.
BB

Bismah Basharat

McMaster University
EB

Elliott Beaton

University of New Orleans
SB

Sean Beaudette

McMaster University
NC

Nathan Cooper

McMaster University
AK

Ayesha Khan

McMaster University
AM

Arpa Modi

McMaster University
HP

Heather Poole

McMaster University
Heather Poole is a postdoctoral fellow at the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Heather's background is in experimental psychology.
JS

Jeremy Sandor

McMaster University
SS

Signy Sheldon

McGill University
JW

Joshua Wiener

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

Small steps into the sky: Introductory astronomy students’ knowledge prior to planetarium education (Poster)
While there are large bodies of literature evaluating both the efficacy of planetariums for astronomy instruction at a primary school level (e.g., Brazell, 2009) and university students' level of astronomy knowledge (e.g., Rudmann, 2002), there is little research concerning the use of planetariums for higher education.  The aim of this study is to contribute to answering the questions of whether planetariums are an effective teaching environment for university-level courses, and whether interactive lessons in planetariums are more effective than traditional lecture-style planetarium shows for university instruction. We anticipate the results for this study may be generalized to other disciplines that also use immersive environments and hands-on activities as part of their teaching practices. We are testing planetarium instruction as part of two introductory astronomy courses offered at McMaster University. Participating students enrolled in the courses have taken a pre-test to gauge their existing understanding of celestial motion and the Solar System, and were invited to participate in an intervention partway through the course before taking an identical post-test at the end of term. The intervention consisted of two one-hour classes about celestial motion and the Solar System, either in a classroom or in a planetarium, and with either an interactive lesson or a traditional lecture-style show. We report on the initial findings from the pre-test about students' knowledge of astronomy as they enter their introductory astronomy courses, and discuss our next steps in the project.

Speakers
RC

Robert Cockcroft

McMaster University
IF

Ian Fare

McMaster University


Thursday December 10, 2015 3:00pm - 3:50pm EST
McMaster Innovation Park Atrium

3:00pm EST

3:50pm EST